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  1. #21

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    Hello, to all that helped, thanks a lot. I think all of this knowledege will help me make the rite decisison.

    To all that were wondering about my mysterious beseler 45 printmaker, you were correct, as it is a beseler 35 printmaker. I dont know what i was thinking.

    My last question, is how can you tell, if the mirror box and diffuser are wide enough to light up a medium format negative? Is it as easy as it seams, look at how big of an area it can lite up? Also, as im not an expert on enlarger parts, whats an easy way to find these two parts?

    thanks alot,

    nlochner
    Where is the art in digital photography?..

  2. #22
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nlochner
    Hello, to all that helped, thanks a lot. I think all of this knowledege will help me make the rite decisison.

    To all that were wondering about my mysterious beseler 45 printmaker, you were correct, as it is a beseler 35 printmaker. I dont know what i was thinking.

    My last question, is how can you tell, if the mirror box and diffuser are wide enough to light up a medium format negative? Is it as easy as it seams, look at how big of an area it can lite up? Also, as im not an expert on enlarger parts, whats an easy way to find these two parts?

    thanks alot,

    nlochner
    Your 67s dichroic will have a light mixing chamber in it - it goes between the light source and the negative stage. There are two types - a 35mm chamber, and a 6x7 chamber. They tend to be labelled on the front of the box.

    I believe that the 67s would have come with the 6x7 chamber - the 35mm chamber was meant as an accessory.

    Here is a B&H listing for the 35mm chamber:

    35mm mixing chamber

    the 6x7 chamber has the same exterior dimensions (about the size of a small coffee cup).

    The chamber itself looks fairly inconsequential - like someone had some extra styrofoam that would fit well in the opening, and decided to put it there.

    If you have the 6x7 chamber, you can use it for all sizes up to 6x7. The only advantage of the 35mm chamber is it will give you shorter exposure times for 35mm and smaller films. If you have only the 35mm chamber, you will need to find a 6x7 chamber to use anything larger.

    If there is no label on thechamber you have (they are just stuck on) than look at the size of the opening where the light comes out - if it is approximately the size of a 35mm frame, it is a 35mm chamber.

    If you have a 67c (condenser) lamphead, they generally come with all necessary condensers - one just needs to reposition them in the head.

    With respect to the size and weight concerns for Mamiya RB67, unless you have a prism finder on them, IMHO they aren't incredibly heavy compared to my Mamiya C330, but they are very large and therefore, potentially awkward.

    Hope this helps.

    Matt

  3. #23
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    Don't forget the folders.

    N, one last idea on cameras -- look into the many types of folding MF rangefinder cameras made in Germany in the 1950s. They are small and light, compact like a 35mm rangefinder. And they are plentiful and cheap. Take your chances on eBay and you can snag a good user for $50. Splurge and buy one completely refurbished by Jurgen Krekel, and you'll still spend no more than $200 or so for most models. Jurgen's site is at www.certo6.com -- it is a virtual encyclopedia of folding cameras from Agfa to Zeiss and you can learn a ton there about them. I bought a Balda Super Baldax (6x6) and an Agfa Record III (6x9) from Jurgen and have been very happy with both cameras. Here's a link to a photo I took with the Balda, of my girlfriend with the Agfa Record (which she has since claimed as her own):

    http://www.mcnew.net/6x6/slides/030Melanie8.html

    Sanders McNew
    www.mcnew.net

  4. #24

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    Thanks again, and i have a 35 mm stage, not a 6x7. Unfortunately when i bought the enlarger, the seller asked if i did medium format, and i said no, so i think she discluded the 6x7 stage in the package.


    Cheers,

    nick
    Where is the art in digital photography?..

  5. #25

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    HEY!

    I think that one of the biggest advantages medium format has over the 35mm is that it gives the ability to view the image projected by the camera on the mate screen with both eyes. It makes the photography a lot different than peeking through the keyhole like viewfinder in 35mm camera.
    That’s why I suggest getting a camera with waist level finder that is at least 6x6. IMO the square format is the most adventurous because standard rules of composition do not apply to it in the same way they apply to other non-square formats. For me 6x7 Mamiya RZ is the weapon of choice, buy you might find it to be to bulky and cumbersome.

    Good luck,
    Michal.

  6. #26

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    Seconded on the utility of a folder (in some situations), and the price. I got a folder, an Ikonta, from Jurgen and am pleased. It had some problems, he made it right. Couldn't ask for more. I'd buy from him again.

    But also depends on what you want to do with the camera. Many folders, you have to guess the distance for focus. A TLR is easier to use in that case, because you can see what the focus looks like on the groundglass. Other folders have rangefinder focus, and then my gripe isn't valid. You can still have the lens / bellows in the way when composing, but you learn to work around that.

    Anyway, due to lack of rangefinder focus, my own folder isn't much good for close-up or portraits, but it's great for scenics (ie, not closeups) where there's lots of light and the focus is far and the DOF is wide, and focus not so critical. It folds small enough to fit in a very small drybox, so it can go kayaking / rafting / to the beach with me.

    The original poster wants to try MF. I'd guess cheaply, to get a taste. So I'd tend to steer him / her away from a Hassy or Rollei and into something more low-end with most of the same performance. That leaves the folders, Yashicamat TLR, Ciro-Flex TLR. Any of them, in good shape, will give negs that blow 35mm away.

    Agreed on the groundglass focussing. Makes me feel like an artist instead of a squinter.

  7. #27
    MAGNAchrom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nlochner
    what film do most of you use?
    Kodak Portra 400NC

    what size film do you use?
    6x7, 6x9, 6x12 on 220 (I rarely if ever buy 120)

    what film is easiest to get?
    Depends where you are. Around Boston Portra is easy to find. In Santa Fe and Albuquerque, I had a lot of trouble. Interestingly enough, in New Mexico, E-6 is the primary color medium format film.

    What is the cost of film?
    Getting more expensive every day. I buy from Adorama.

    how do you get your film processed?
    Pro lab two towns over (www.colorvisionphotographics.com)

    Do professional labs still print it?
    Yes, at least here in Boston they do.
    J Michael Sullivan
    Editor/Publisher, MAGNAchrom
    www.magnachrom.com

    ...SOMETIMES I SEE THINGS...

  8. #28

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    I think you should get the Mamiya 645 pro camera or the Bronica ETRSi. These camera's are relatively affordable and are manageable off the tripod as well as on. The Bronica gets the nod with high sync speeds but the Mamiya gets the nod in everything else. Either of these would be a good place to start in medium format. For a new to the format person with a budget this is the way to go. Additional lenses are also relatively inexpensive. I have the Mamiya Pro tl and just purchased a 45mm lens in mint condition on ebay for only $85.00. For portrature I would suggest a lens of about 150mm. That is roughly an 80mm lens on a 35mm camera..The larger film size is really fun and it provides a new clarity to your images..You will have a lot of fun with the camera... It's also neat the way people respond to you with your camera..Your subjects will have more confidence in you just because your camera is big...Nolan

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by nlochner
    how do you get your film processed?
    For processing your own -- and a couple of other basic questions -- you might want to have a look at the latest free module in the Photo School at www.rogerandfrances.com. Go to the Photo School and then to 'How do I...?' You'll find a module that shows you backing paper, loading, formats and a step-by-step sequence for loading 120 onto both steel and plastic spirals.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by nlochner
    Hello, i shoot a lot of 35mm, and know nothing of Medium Format photography. I really want to stat doing portraiture, and was wondering, if medium format is good for that, knowing that i don't want to start large format. Here are a few general questions i have.
    What kind of camera would you recommend for a starter? (Student budget in mind.)

    what film do most of you use?

    what size film do you use?

    what film is easiest to get?

    What is the cost of film?

    how do you get your film processed?

    Do professional labs still print it?

    What is the cost of film?
    [...]
    nlochner
    I am new to APUG, but do have some suggestions here:

    With protraiture you will want a studio worthy camera - and the negative should be as big as possible - 6x6 or 6x7 if possible. 6x4.5 would be a good choice if you wanted a slightly larger naegative from 35mm in order to do a lot of action/nature shots and so on.

    You can get a used Mamiya kit or Hasselblad 500-series without breaking the bank. I would recommand getting one of the Hasselblad 500C kits that are floating around now, and get a 1.4 teleconverter for the 80mm lens, and you will have a nearly perfect portrait setup! DOn't get hung up on if the lens is T* coated or not - all Hasselblad lenses are excellent and you can save money if it isn't. You can always get one later if you feel you must. Oh, you will also want to get a decent light meter if you don't want one already. Most 35mm cameras have a built in light meter, but most medium formats (older ones anyway) might not.

    If you want portability, aside from TLR's your options are somewhat limited - an older Pentax 6x7 (6cm x 7cm negative!) might be your only choice that would have reasonable pricing. It is heavy enough that you should check it out carefully before committing - and mirror lock-up is important to avoid the camera shaking due to 'mirror slap.' The 'blad may be cheaper!

    Film: Tmax 100/400/3200 and color slide film for copy work. C41 B&W if I want to shoot something and develop it cheaply.

    Size film: ?? 6x6?

    Easiest to get: It varies, but in Rochester, NY Kodak is easiest to get in any sizes. Fuji and Ilford are both available, but you have to look.

    Developing: Color film I have a lab do it. I am trying out a couple of local labs here right now. B&W - due to some time constraints, I may break down and have a lab do it as well.

    Most dedicated labs process and print the film. If they can do TMAX in 35mm, chances are they'll do 120 film. I know of 3 places in town that advertise that they do it (and incidentally 2 of those 3 places will do 4x5 negative processing!). If you aren't in a city, you may end up sending them off, though you'd be surprised. Hand processing is easy to do (B&W), though depending upon your situation, you may or may not want to do it.

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