Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,971   Posts: 1,523,550   Online: 783
      
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    kb244's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Mi
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    818
    Images
    63

    T-adapter on an Mamiya RB67?

    Aside from the obvious issue of weight and bulk on the back of a scope and such, to which if I could would just setup some kind of a tripoded raile to hold both the camera and scope so that one or the other is not bearing weight down on it. So this thread is basically based on curiousity, not out of nessesity since I have other means of doing what I want.

    The quick question is.... do T-Adapters exist for some medium format cameras.

    The details of what I've been using:
    Celestron C90 Mak with the camera adapter tube as picturered here (click image for more images).


    The nice thing about the scope is that I can view down from the top if I wish, but also from the back. Also the back peice you can remove the eyepeice holder or angle viewer and attach the T-Adapter for the scope itself. Allowing me to view from the top and switch to the bottom with a camera attached. The direct path on the back does not go thru an eyepeice at all but straight into the camera. The scope is a 3.5" (90mm aperture) Maksutov-Cassegrain Spotting Scope and is waterproof so both front and back are closed off.

    More information about the scope can be seen at the manufacture's website here http://www.celestron.com/c2/product....=30&ProdID=203 (though its interesting, I didn't think they would be using my picture at the bottom :P)

    Far as the camera I been using on the back, I've used my digital rebel, Canon EOS-1, and Canon FTb via either the EF or FD T-Adapter for the camera itself, but been wondering bout the possibility of using something such as my RB67 on the back of the scope, and higher speed film.

    My main concern is actual coverage, I wouldn't be using a eyepeice on the scope, so its whatever the back of the scope can output, but not sure exactly what coverage it can give even with maybe some distance between the film plane and the scope. I suppose if I riged up some kind of rail with the scope and RB67 on it, and maybe UV or some other form of protector so I Can leave the front of the RB open, then extend the distance back and forth between the scope and the RB67 to see where I get focuse, based on focusing off the top of the scope first, then mvoing the RB67 back and forth on the back.

    Your Thoughts?

    PS: What would be real fun is to be able to do it to a 4x5 :P, though I doubt that even more.
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,325
    T-mount's register is 55 mm. That's enough longer than all 35 mm SLRs to make the system work, but is, I think, shorter than any roll film SLR's register.

    On the other hand, my late absolutely unlamented Celestron C-90 had an extension tube that went between that back of the barrel and the male T-mount. If your 'scope has one, perhaps you can cobble up an adapter.

  3. #3
    kb244's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Mi
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    818
    Images
    63
    ya same adapter I Got for mine, its like a tube one connects to the scope, the other end allows for the T-adapter of the camera to screw on.
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.

  4. #4
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    I am pretty sure you would have to make one Karl, I looked for a couple of different models of MF gear I had for an adaper without success, the only thing I found was a guy in europe that would make an adapter for just about anything, but his costs were way up there, like 2-$400 depending on the application, you could probably find a bad lens and then remove the mount and make something.

    Dave

  5. #5
    kb244's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Mi
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    818
    Images
    63
    Hrm or I can get ahold of an extension tube and butcher that.

    But what about an 'open' system for lunar shots at the dark of night.

    For example as described, a rail with both the scope and mamiya on it, then the rail attached to the tripod. Then I would move the RB up and down the rail to acheive 'focus', but nothing in between the RB and scope. If an open system would not work, I would probally have to rig some kind of bellow extension tube to connect between the scope's back end and the RB's front.
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.

  6. #6
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Karl,

    I will have to take a look, there was an article several years ago in Shutterbug about making an adjustable extension tube out of PVC that would probably work for this application, the key seems to be the mount for the camera, I will dig around and see if I can find it...

    Dave

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    169
    Also remember that the RB67 is designed for leaf-shuttered lenses, so there's no focal plane shutter.

    I think you'd get better results by making an adapter with a t-mount on one side and a mount for the back on the other side.

  8. #8
    kb244's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Mi
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    818
    Images
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by wirehead View Post
    Also remember that the RB67 is designed for leaf-shuttered lenses, so there's no focal plane shutter.

    I think you'd get better results by making an adapter with a t-mount on one side and a mount for the back on the other side.
    Good point.
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin