Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,564   Posts: 1,573,448   Online: 818
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36

Thread: A TLR choice

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,565
    Images
    47
    I have a Rolleiflex T, Yashica D with Yashinon(4 element) and Yashica A with Yashikor (three element)

    The Yashica A (I paid $15 for it) is surprisingly sharp at f8-f16 and not a whole lot different than the four element Yashinon in the "D". However, the Rollei simply blows away the yashicas in image quality and build quality.

    I inherited the Rollei, and paid to have it professionally serviced (CLA). After using the Rollei, I understand why the prices on Rolleis are so much higher. The Yashicas are good cameras, but just not in the same league as the Rollei.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  2. #22
    dustym's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Essex, just outside London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    165
    Images
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by kb244 View Post
    While I agree about the weight, I feel that for someone to be so closed minded to say that "Nothing Beats..." is one of the worst reasons to pitch a brand, just like how nothing beats a hasselblad, a rollei, a leica, deardorf, an alpa.... see where I'm going with this?
    It seems to me its enthusiasm is the key here not pushing a brand, it seems some comments are taken a little to seriously sometimes, the poster is just very keen on Rollei as am I.

    Dustym
    www.clickpic.com/essexmomochrome
    The camera cannot lie, but it cannot help being selective.

  3. #23
    Jerevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,873
    Images
    9
    Well, to me a good, inexpensive TLR is a Rolleicord. Slight differences on the various models, but anything from a III (with the Xenar) up to the last Vb is a good start. Even the older 'Cords with Triotars are nice but they need to be stopped down a bit to perform at their sharpest. The only models to really avoid are the oldest ones without the bayonet on the taking lens. Filters and hoods can be hard to source for these.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Israel
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    365
    Wow, guys, thanks (albeit somewhat overhalming) :-)
    What do you say abuot Rollei SL66 ? How it fares ? I know, it is SLR and apparently allows soem lens movements. I thought to consider one with standard 80mm lens.
    Is it heavy beast ? Combersome to use ?

    I'm now approaching an important point in my photo passion: deciding to jump off 35mm trane selling all my 35mm gear (Canon professional setup + Nikon 35mm scanner) willing to go with a simple yet robust MF to back up my LF passion. I'm going to post a dedictaed thread in this regard to seek opinions.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    531
    Images
    133
    Hi Alex,

    it is large, it is heavy and is nearly impossible to use freehand. Without the handgrip you must change the grip between focussing (the knob is on the left) and supporting the camera while releasing the shutter. The handgrip makes it even larger. I have one but never used it. I always use it from a tripod.

    But of cause, there are guys even using a RB67 freehand.

    Ulrich
    Last edited by Ulrich Drolshagen; 11-16-2006 at 04:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    341
    For what it's worth...

    I'll toss my vote in for the Rolleicord V / Rolleiflex from the 1950s.

    I have one of each, love using them both. I don't see the difference in optics between the two, but I slightly prefer to use the 'flex due to the lack of the shutter and aperture being linked, and because the crank film advance feels faster and better than the 'cords knob advance. Oh, also the shutter release on the 'flex just feels much better than on the 'cord.

    But my 'cord has a bright screen divided by thirds, while my 'flex just has the standard (rather dim) Rollei screen. That single change almost negates all the "better handling" features of the 'flex - but not quite.

    Not sure this is an issue for you, but I travel a lot by motorcycle. I have no hard data, but I suspect the old over-built Rollei TLRs take that in stride better than many newer cameras. Just a hunch, mind you.

  7. #27
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    New York City
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,274
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by kb244 View Post
    Nothing eh? I'd say a good Mamiya C3 or C330 TLR with the good lens like the 80mm f/2.8 (the lens are interchangeable) and such would come close if not least surpass...

    But thats my opinion of the matter.
    Well, Karl, at least you and I can agree, here in this forum, that NOTHING beats film. We might differ on our tools, but in the end we share the common bond of silver gelatin.

    Sanders.

  8. #28
    butterflydream's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Korea
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    192
    Images
    31
    SL66 is nice camera and its lenses are great, but is very large and heavy. SL66E and SL66SE are with exposure meter that is accurate and convenient. The bellows can tilt as well, though limited. You can use standard lens reversed for close-up.

    It is mechanically much more complicated than Hasselblad, and is prone to trouble. I had one, but it costed me much money when I had to get it repaired. Once the mechanism was jammed after I changed film back and the other time the plastic rack gear was broken.

    Focal plane shutter works with big noise and shock.

    It's not cheap. With the price of SL66 I think you can purchase top line Rolleiflex TLR such as 3.5F or 2.8F.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Israel
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    365
    Thank you guys, that really helps to putmy considerations in a proper order..
    Hasselblad/Rollei SLR options now failed, we left with:
    1. TLR Planar/Xenotar (presumably Rolleiflex)
    2. Cheaper TLR with Tessar/Xenar or similar (Rolleiflex/cord, Yashica Mat 124 or Minolta Autocord)
    3. Pentax 645N
    4. Rangefinder (Bronica RF645, no larger needed)

    Have never used rangefinders so far, not sure how it is convenient for say, environmental portraiture (where 6x6 TLR excells), but small, light and high quality.
    What about comparative analysis of TLR vs. rangefinder when simplicity yet robustness is desired ?

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    531
    Images
    133
    > Once the mechanism was jammed after I changed film back

    Rule #1: Whatever you do, cock the shutter first

    AFAIK this rule more or less applies to all MF-cameras with interchangeable backs and shutters in lenses.

    As any other mechanical device a SL66 can break, especially when abused. I can't see why it should be more prone to demage than let's say a RB67, which features a bellows too.

    I agree on your attitude towards Rolleiflex TLR though.

    Ulrich

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin