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Thread: A TLR choice

  1. #31
    Abbazz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kb244 View Post
    Nothing eh? I'd say a good Mamiya C3 or C330 TLR with the good lens like the 80mm f/2.8 (the lens are interchangeable) and such would come close if not least surpass.
    I second Karl's opinion. I find the Mamiya C series the most usable TLRs with their interchangeable lenses ranging from 55 to 250mm and close focusing capability with built-in bellows. And there is some great glass available for it!

    I acknowledge a Rolleiflex is a masterpiece of German technology, but you can find better cameras with sharper lenses today. And while I love my Koniflex with its 5 glass Heliar-type lens which takes superb portraits, I must admit that I don't use it a lot because I find it rather clumsy. Fixed lens TLRs are well suited to certains tasks, but they are rather limited cameras by today standards.

    Cheers,

  2. #32
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    I agree that Mamiya C cameras are very versatile, but they are also very heavy - I got rid of mine because I coulnd't find a 55 mm lens (I bought 2 examples) to match the performance of the other system lenses (the 55 seemed to need quite a lot of stopping down to get the edges sharp and also seemed prone to flare).

    The Tessars/Xenars on 1950s/1960s Rolleis in my view perform well even by modern standards, with good contrast and good central sharpness even at full aperture. Of course they need stopping down a couple of stops to bring the edges and corners fully in. The major advantage of these cameras is of course their size and weight. I always found Rolleis far superior in build quality to Yaschicas and Minoltas, although the lenses on these were not at all bad.

    In the present day, when Rolleiflexes and Rolleicords seem to sell for not very different prices, there's not much to say in favor of Rolleicords - the buiild quality and lenses is OK, the shutter release (combined with the cocking lever) is awful - if I have to use one of these, I forget about the body release and use a short cable release. A Rolleicord shutter release button was available as an optional extra but does not help much.

    Regards,

    David

  3. #33
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David H. Bebbington View Post
    In the present day, when Rolleiflexes and Rolleicords seem to sell for not very different prices, there's not much to say in favor of Rolleicords - the buiild quality and lenses is OK, the shutter release (combined with the cocking lever) is awful - if I have to use one of these, I forget about the body release and use a short cable release. A Rolleicord shutter release button was available as an optional extra but does not help much.
    I both agree and disagree on a couple of points. Yes, the combined cocking lever and shutter release is not very good and if I am using it on a tripod I would also use a cable release. Hand held, you can get used to it. You have to make sure your hand is not obscuring the taking lens which you obviously can't see when you're looking through the viewing lens!

    I prefer having separate winding and cocking rather than a combined winder as it is something less to go wrong. This may be a minor point and is just my opinion. In real life it may not be a problem.

    I don't actually have any experience of a Rolleiflex wind on/cocking mechanism going wrong but I did try to repair a friend's Yashicamat which would not cock when winding but I could not get it to work. This has probably prejudiced my opinions of The Rolleiflex cocking method. Possibly unfairly.

    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #34
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I don't actually have any experience of a Rolleiflex wind on/cocking mechanism going wrong but I did try to repair a friend's Yashicamat which would not cock when winding but I could not get it to work. This has probably prejudiced my opinions of The Rolleiflex cocking method. Possibly unfairly.

    Steve.
    I think this is rather confirmation of what I said about the relative build quality of Roillei on the one hand and Yashica/Minolta on the other! I have experienced a Rolleiflex winding mechanism failing to lock and turning a roll of 120 into a 2- or 3-exposure film, but this was just due to dried-out grease. The biggest problem with any old TLR is ageing of the viewing mirror and focusing screen, which can make focusing very hard.

    Regards,

    David

  5. #35
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    I've run tens of thousands of rolls of film through a variety of Rolleiflexes over the years, and have never once had a problem with the film wind/cocking mechanism. Things like that just never happen to Rolleiflexes.

    If you want small and light, you should consider a folding camera. Check out www.certo6.com for a thorough discussion of the options. The site owner, Jurgen Krekel, also reconditions and sells the cameras at very low prices. I carry around a Super Baldax 6x6 when I'm traveling light. the optics aren't up to Rolleiflex standards but they make pleasing images in their own right.

    Sanders.

  6. #36
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David H. Bebbington View Post
    I think this is rather confirmation of what I said about the relative build quality of Roillei on the one hand and Yashica/Minolta on the other!
    Yes, you're quite correct. When I wrote that I both agreed and disagreed with you it was 98% agreement and 2% disagreement!

    The bit I didn't quite agree with was this bit:

    'In the present day, when Rolleiflexes and Rolleicords seem to sell for not very different prices, there's not much to say in favor of Rolleicords'

    For me personally, I don't see any advantage of the self cocking film advance lever over the simpler separate wind on and cocking of the Rolleicord. Rather, I see it as something extra to go wrong.

    I will admit though that a Rolleiflex type shutter release would be preferable and although you get use to it, I would prefer the aperture and shutter controls not to have the constant EV linkage.

    As I said, This is only my opinion and other peoples ways of working are equally valid.

    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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