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  1. #1

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    Developing & Loading the 120 Film...

    Hello,

    I have done a search already so if I'm treading old ground I apologise there didn't seem to be a specific answer to my question.

    I've just shot and developed my first roll of 120..... yay...... and I'm pretty relieved to say it wasn't too bad - bit stressful but in time like the 35mm it'll get easier I guess.

    I shot 12 pix obviously but only got 9 and a damaged tenth one. Here's the question - on 35mm you get the film leader to load in the camera and then to use when loading the spiral on 120 you're dealing with paper. Loading the camera was ok loading the spiral was a different matter.

    Do you cut off the paper completely?, Or do you load the spiral using the paper (tried this it was impossible - too bendy)

    I guess when I cut off the paper I fogged the last two & a bit pix taken - are you meant to load the spiral in the pitch black darkness then coz with the 35 mm you get the chance to at least put the film in the spiral.

    I'm sorry this is so wordy I know what I'm trying to say I just hope you do too!

    Pretty pleased with my first effort though - I know its practise

    Many thanks
    Rebecca

    http://www.rebecca-sichelcoates.com
    Thanks

    Rebecca

    www.rebecca-sichelcoates.com

  2. #2

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    << Do you cut off the paper completely?, Or do you load the spiral using the paper (tried this it was impossible - too bendy)....>>

    In the changing bag, I have the exposed film, reel, and tank.

    I unroll the film from the paper backing. It's held there with masking tape. I make 2 rolls, one of paper and one of film. I put the masking tape onto the paper and set it aside. You can tell the difference between paper and film by feel / stiffness / positition.

    Then I load the film onto the reel.

    A suggestion - sacrifice a roll of film and load it in the light. See and understand what you're doing. You do that, and you probably won't lose any more pics to developing.

  3. #3
    André E.C.'s Avatar
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    Hi Rebecca,

    I unroll until I can feel the film, separate the paperbacking a bit and start the reel loading (film only) and cut the paper when reach the point where they are taped.

    Cheers

    André

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by RebeccaSC View Post
    Hello,
    are you meant to load the spiral in the pitch black darkness then coz with the 35 mm you get the chance to at least put the film in the spiral.

    Yup in the dark. I tend to leave the paper on until I get to the end of the roll. Then pull it off. In other words I load the unattached end first letting the paper hang free. Then pull the paper off. Fun to watch the sparks

  5. #5
    clogz's Avatar
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    Hello Rebecca,
    It is all a matter of practice, although it must be said that loading 120 is a bit more difficult than 35mm. A nice gadget that may help you can be found on www.novadarkroom.co.uk and it's called the Nova Spiral Easy Loader.

    Hans
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

  6. #6

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    Good Evening, Rebecca,

    The most common practice is similar to that outlined by DougGrosjean, except that many people peel the tape from the backing paper and fold it over the end of the film. Doing that stiffens things a bit and generally simplifies loading. You haven't mentioned the reels you're using, but I've found those with a spike in the center to puncture and hold the film are greatly superior to those which use the oft-found "springy-thingy" instead. Kinderman reels have the spike. With minimal practice you'll soon find that loading 120 is about the simplest thing to be found in darkroom work. 220--now that's sometimes a different story.

    Konical

  7. #7

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    <<< .... except that many people peel the tape from the backing paper and fold it over the end of the film. >>>>

    Thanks for the tip! I'm going to try it that way next time. Kicking my own butt for not thinking of it myself.

  8. #8

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    Are you using stainless steel or plastic spirals? Either way they have to be loaded in total darkness of course. I'm another one that prefers to detach the paper before loading the spiral (preferably one with the centre spike), but there are options. Like most things, it's easy once you get the hang of it!



    Richard

  9. #9

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    On the stainless steel spools as I roll the film on I test the tension every so often. If the film is loose it is correct, if it is tight, something is wrong. Just unspool a few turns and do it again.

  10. #10

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    I dono. So far I've found 120 easier to load than 35mm...

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