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  1. #11
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Don't worry about the gloating, my last one that I purchased, I got for the large sum of $15 in a second hand shop here in Montana, and sold it for way more than that! The photographers around here(the old timers) compared it to the best in its day, there are many that preffered it to the Hassleblads, the Medalist I, was used a lot during WWII by the military photojournalists and quite often you will find them with military markings on them, I did quite a bit of shooting with the last one I had and it was as good as anything I had at that time for sharpness color and contrast, do some tests just on a brick wall with chromes and you will see what people talk about, you have got yourself a Cult Classic there Murray! The 6x9 format is great!

    Dave

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you have ever read any of the books about the Canadian Arctic that Farley Mowat wrote, you may have noted that the photographs in those books were taken by him using a Medalist. About once a year he used to bring his camera to the Kodak lab in North Vancouver, British Columbia to have it CLA'd. My father (who was in charge of the customer service intake department there) spoke to him on a number of occasions when he did that. Apparently, he was convinced that his Medalist was the only camera that he'd ever used that performed reliably in the Arctic conditions he photographed in.

    Matt

  3. #13

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    I've seen 20x30" prints from negatives made in the 1950s from a medalist owned by a friend of mine. Superb. Great camera and optics. Enjoy.

    Peter gomena

  4. #14

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    These are very nice camera, and the Ektar is a really sharp lens. The body is a bit chunky, so if you have tiny hands, you might want to consider using it on a tripod.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by DougGrosjean View Post
    I seem to recall it's now close to $500. I can justify a CLA, but it takes me a lot of re-spooling to make up that $500.
    It's not necessary to spend that much. I sent mine to Manfred Schmidt for a half-conversion (120 supply, 620 take-up). I think I paid around $90 and it only took him two or three days to turn it around. Works like a charm.

    If you don't develop your own film remember to ask for the spools back - otherwise it does get expensive, quickly.

  6. #16

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    doesn't j&c sell 620 film?
    i remember reading somewhere that
    they have a machine that either modifies a 120 spool or
    respools the film on a 620-thingy.

    - john
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  7. #17

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    Thanks, Tchamber. Even at $100 I probably would pass, as I have about (15) 620 spools now.

    Jnanian: there are people who sell a trimmed-down and re-bushed (so the trimmed film roll fits onto 620-format spindles) 120 film rolls. I found mine on Ebay, I'm sure other places exist as well. But once you re-spool, you think the trimmed stuff isn't worth it.

  8. #18
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Trimmed 120 spools are still a challenge in the film chamber of the Medalist, I know I tried, it is a very tight film chamber, re-spooling is actually very simple, I can do enough in about 1/2 hour to cover a weekend of shooting..and if you know where to look its really not that hard to find 620 spools.

    Dave

  9. #19
    bruce terry's Avatar
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    All this Medalist vintage talk has me fondling the fold-out rails of my wife's dad's working 1946 Monitor (Kodak Anastigmat Special f/4.5 101mm lens).

    Don't know I'll actually ever go to the trouble of spooling it up but the enthusiasm here tells me I should.

    Thanks for giving me something else to feel guilty about. :•(

    Bruce

  10. #20

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    The film chamber has very little tolerance. In fact, even a 620 spool is a very tight fit. I don't believe a trimmed 120 spool will fit.

    The easiest way to get a 620 spool is to buy some of the very inexpensive Kodak cameras from the 1950s and 1960s. Often, they will have a spool in them.

    You can usually find these cameras at flea markets for just a few dollars.

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