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  1. #21

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    If you have the "Hassy fever" you should buy at least one, once in your life. You'll either treasure the camera and use it regularly or not, but in the latter case, you're getting it "out of your system."

    Personally, I love my 500C/M (and CF lenses), but I waited many years to buy one so I could satiate my lust.

    A good friend and camera salesman used to tell me: "You will take better pictures with the Hassy, just because of the way you feel about the camera."

    I've had other cameras and I truly don't know if the photos from the Hassy are "better," but I do know that using the camera delights me more than using any other--from 35mm all the way to 4x5. I've had many, and the Hassy will be the last to go.

    Unlike other crafts, we photogs (or many of us, anyway) love the equipment in addition to the results. I don't think painters fall in love with their brushes the way photogs fall in love with their cameras. Strange.

    So if holding a Hassy gives you a warm and fuzzy feeling that you don't get from holding the Pentax, I think you have your answer. Just my opinion.

  2. #22
    Antje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatTrent View Post
    If you have the "Hassy fever" you should buy at least one, once in your life. You'll either treasure the camera and use it regularly or not, but in the latter case, you're getting it "out of your system."

    ...

    So if holding a Hassy gives you a warm and fuzzy feeling that you don't get from holding the Pentax, I think you have your answer. Just my opinion.
    Words of wisdom... I bought one and fell in love right away. I just got mine a 50/4 for my birthday. It said it feels incomplete without a wide angle. The cat started hissing at it because the Hassy takes the best spot on the sofa... Well, she'll adapt to the new addition to the household.

    Antje

  3. #23

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    Get the Hasselblad. I got one a couple of months ago. This is after buying two other MF kits over the last 10 years. I just feel good finally having a Hasselblad after really wanting one but denying myself all this time.

  4. #24

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    I've both, the Pentax 645 for about five years and the Hasselblad 503cx for maybe one.

    I favor the Pentax for several reasons..
    It's meant to be handheld. It's QUICK and responsive. It's not very large. It's downright inexpensive used at the moment. 645 is economical. The 75mm lens is fantastic. It focuses _much_ closer without the aid of tubes or diopters than the 80mm Zeiss C. The pentax even has an adjustable eyepiece diopter which is nice.

    You can't change the film in mid-roll. Some films like the Foma 400 don't work well with P645 (won't rewind after 15 exposures, you have to take it out in a darkroom or bag)
    The eyepiece viewer bothers some people. Some don't like the 'chiclet buttons'. There aren't really any accessories.
    Renting lenses is tough. You have to flip the camera around for horizontal and vertical. Using it with a studio flash isn't much fun. The winder is also loud.

    The Hasselblad feels and looks more 'well-made'. You will cry the moment it is dented/scratched/scuffed. You will also cry when you realize you want the Makro Planar and have to work a second job to afford it (even used in my case) You will cry even more once you realize the Pentax macro lens is maybe $300 used from KEH. It's slow(er) to use, atleast for me. It's loud. It's costly. It's beautiful to look at and hold and use.

    But as a workhorse, I favor the Pentax. Sorry for the rant. I need to apug more, it gets bottled up.

  5. #25

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    I have too many medium format camera including both the Pentax 645 and a Hasselblad. Although may seem to hold Hasselblad above the others, it is my least favorite camera. The Pentax 645 is by far the best medium format SLR I've ever used. It has very low vibration, is lightweight and the motordrive surprised me in how much it improves being able to keep the camera at your eye. However, if you want a camera for use mostly on a tripod, I would choose a 6x7 camera instead. This is especially true if you like 16x20 prints or larger. I find the difference in negative size very obvious in a 16x20 B&W print. Smaller prints show very little difference.

    Hope this helps.

  6. #26

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    For shoots on tripod HASSELBLAD, for hand shoots PENTAX 645!

  7. #27

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    If you've been shooting 35 previously, the Pentax will feel more natural at first. Both systems have good optics, at least in my experience, although IMHO the Hasselblad wide angles are superior (but cost a lot more!). I've come to appreciate the square negative for its cropping possibilities, and because you only have to hold the camera one way, whether for vertical or horizontal framing. One of the biggest Hassie advantages, though, is having interchangeable backs--you can reload very quickly, mix different kinds of film, and even change format from 6x6 to 6x4.5 if you want to.

  8. #28
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    If I had to make the decision, I would pick the Hasselblad for studio work and the Pentax for field work.

  9. #29
    Peter Williams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole View Post
    I'd suggest playing around (renting) both until you know which one you prefer/need for your style of work.
    I'll second this advice. I bought a Hassleblad a couple of years ago and I didn't care for it at all. My big mistake was selling the Rolleiflex to get it. If you have the opportunity to use it first, I certainly would. Lots of folks love them, but there are a few of us out there who don't. On a separate note, I would be very wary of buying any used camera that I know for certain isn't in top working condition. Without knowing exactly what will need to be done in advance, the necessary repairs could very well spoil a good deal up front.
    If you can't answer a man's argument, all is not lost; you can still call him vile names.
    - Elbert Hubbard

  10. #30

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    It took twenty years of commerical work for my hasselblad to need repairs......my vote is hasselblad in the studio, I use M7 for the street and love it.

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