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  1. #1
    Mike Té's Avatar
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    and another thing about that c330...

    I'm just getting used to the waist level finder.... I've never had so much vertigo!
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

  2. #2

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    I highly recommend the Porrofinder or prism. A "bargain" Porrofinder from KEH is $25.

  3. #3
    wclavey's Avatar
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    Of the two, I recommend the prism finder over the porrofinder. The prism finder is heavier but much brighter and lets you see the whole ground glass without looking around inside. The porrofinder is lighter and less expensive (it seems) but dimmer and I have to make an effort and move my eye and head around to see all the image. I use both but am considering replacing the porrofinder.

    Also, using either of these finders, you lose the sometimes interesting perspective that a TLR brings from having the viewing point lower to the ground than an SLR would be. I find myself shooting both ways some days, depending on the image I want to make.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by wclavey View Post
    Also, using either of these finders, you lose the sometimes interesting perspective that a TLR brings from having the viewing point lower to the ground than an SLR would be. I find myself shooting both ways some days, depending on the image I want to make.
    I totally agree. I just thought I'd save him from getting dizzy and falling over ...

  5. #5

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    You can practice a bit in the house and you will get used to it. I always invision that the camera is a control stick on a plane. Works for me!
    art is about managing compromise

  6. #6
    Mike Té's Avatar
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    Ha!

    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    I totally agree. I just thought I'd save him from getting dizzy and falling over ...
    It's a definite risk, what with the weight of the thing and all...

    I don't really mind it; the experience is still new to me yet. I find it to be a kind of visuo-spatial exercise. Sort of takes me "out of the box".
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

  7. #7
    Mike Té's Avatar
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    All the same, I have seen another type of prism finder:

    http://www.baierfoto.de/mameng.html
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    How are you using the Waist Level finder ("WLF") - with or without the pop up magnifier?

    Are you aware that your WLF may have a built in sports finder?

    I have both a prism finder and WLFs for my Mamiya TLRs. While I use the prism finder more, I use and have used (since the 1970s) the WLFs a lot too.

    Very few photographers can use WLFs successfully for fast changing action, unless they use the sports finder, and zone focus.

    If your subject is reasonably slow moving, and sufficiently low, the WLF is wonderful, because it concentrates attention, but boy it is different (I remember the vertigo!).

    The trick is to use the WLF enough to get used to it, become familiar with its weaknesses, strengths and effects, and then exploit those strengths and effects.

    And it's great fun to go through the process.

    One hint - look for things that you wouldn't have thought to photograph, because the best angle is a very low one.

    There is a reason that when I got my Mamiya 645 Super with included prism finder, one of the first accessories I purchased was a WLF.

    Have fun,

    Matt

  9. #9
    JJC
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    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande View Post
    You can practice a bit in the house and you will get used to it. I always invision that the camera is a control stick on a plane. Works for me!
    When I got mine, it took about a week of practice around the house to get
    used to it. And then you only get better from there! By now, when I get the pictures back, I hardly ever remember even seeing the images reversed.

    I think you're going to like that camera.
    "Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Jim Horning

  10. #10
    Blighty's Avatar
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    I use a metered chimney finder with my C330f and up to now I haven't had a problem with the reversed image except when the subject is fast moving, when I sometimes end up panning in the opposite direction. Noticed the link to the Baier website. Has anyone used one of those metered prisms. How do they measure up (no pun) in terms of metering accuracy and build quality?
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

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