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  1. #21
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I have an rb pro-sd. My advice is to stick to the newest rb lenses, there are differences. Mind that there is one semi-important differences between the pro sd and the older models- the "throat" on the newer lenses is different from that on the older rb lenses, but there is an inexpensive Lens Mount Adapter Ring that you can get, it's just a little ring.

    I have recently been considering going to an rz pro IId just because of the 110/2.8 lens, there isn't anything that fast in the rb lineup. Also, all the rb lenses can go on a rz but not vice versa, as far as I know. So in that sense your access to new or used lenses is double with the rz. Also if you have visions of putting a digiback then an rz would probably be the easier route. If I do pick up an rz I will keep the rb though, it is a gem and it iwll almost certainly outlive me.

    Regarding weight, I have used the rb handheld (with the grip), with a fisheye and a metering prism, and I'm not even all that buff. Okay maybe I am a little bit buff <ahem> Anyway it can be done for short (~1 hr) periods. For street walking and hiking I will admit that I usually leave the rb behind though, and take a mamiya 6.

    By the way I strongly recommend the metering prism, I haven't used the waist level since I got mine.

    P.S. What is this lag business? I have never observed it.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  2. #22

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    Keith,
    I've been using RB's since the pre C days, (as a teenager in the mid 70's), and while they've gotten better and better, with the exception of the pre C 50mm, any of the lenses are quite good. I agree that the KL series is best, but in all fairness, any of the C series would be more than adequate for 99% of the photographers today.

    I use nearly all the RB lenses, with the exception of the 37mm and the 140 macro (though I am envious, as I can't seem to justify the 8 or 900 for a used 37mm that I just wouldn't use all that much)

    My regular outift that I take shooting is 2 bodies, a w/l finder, prism, 6 to 8 backs, 50, 65, 90, 127, 180, 250, 360, ext tubes, and a compendium shade. It all fits nicely in a large pelican case, and I can pick and choose what I want to use when I get there. That case and my small pelican flter/meter case go with me just about anywhere. If I need to travel light, I can get a body, prism, 50/65/127/180 and a few backs into a small pelican, with a little padding. At the prices that RB have been at, anybody even thinking about it should get a body, back and a few lenses, they're just about giving them away these days (though lately I've noticed the supply is starting to dry up and prices have started to rise)


    erie

  3. #23
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Erie, I agree about the lenses, I have a pre-C 360 that I adore. Judicious shading makes the coating a non-issue.

    One other point perhaps worth mention, I find the kenko teleplus 2x TC to be excellent.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #24

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    I was going to mention my Kenko MC6 2x, but hesitated as most purist would scoff, the 2x with the 360 makes an interesting wildlife setup, I'm working on a cradle to hold the combination in a way that allows focusing. (just have to finish my RB67 lensboard for the 4x5 first)


    erie

  5. #25
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Oh if you're making a lensboard for 4x5 then we need to chat, I've been planning for some time to do some circles on 4x5 (or maybe 5x7 to play it safe) with my RB fisheye. My thought was to cut an extension tube in half and weld it onto a board but I haven't gotten to it yet. I need to figure out a safe way to cock the lens as well.
    Last edited by keithwms; 02-11-2007 at 01:38 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  6. #26

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    easiest way is to by a as-is RB from KEH, less than $45.00, unscrew the bellows and racks on the sides, slide forward, figure out the best way for you to rotate the lens cocking lever, based on your fab/cobbling skills, mount it on a lensboard with some machine screws and locking nuts or tapped holes (use self adhesive foamie gasket, <$1 for a 8x12" sheet from wally world) put your lens in MLU mode, cock to open/compose, close, load film, fire shutter. pretty simple once you play with a lens for 5 mins, it all make sense.


    erie

    (correction: as-is RB67 bodies on KEH range from $10 to $35)

  7. #27

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    Pentax 67 lenses

    I own the 55mm f4.0 SMC. It is the sharpest lens I've ever used. I recently tested it using gigabit film and could resolve 156 lp/mm on the Air Force charts.

  8. #28

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    one thing that I wonder often, how does lpmm relate to image tonality and OOF smoothness, image sharpness is a give, naturally.


    erie

  9. #29

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    erie - how does one remove the bellows from the front standard?

    I can't seem to work out how to do this while keeping the standard as complete as possible...

    David.

  10. #30

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    if you're not in a big rush, give me a week or so, still sorting out from the move, and I can post a pic of the front standard of a pro-s, with the holes hilighted. If you're impatient, fire the body, rack the standard all the way out, then remove the 4 or so screws holding the bellows to the body, remove front standard, then peek inside the bellows and remove the 8 or so screws holding the bellow onto the front standard (from memory)

    erie

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