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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you want to look for something really rare, there is a Mamiya tripod head with built in paramender - mine works really well .

    Matt

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    I think it was called a Paramender. You can of course achieve exactly the same effect, a good deal cheaper, by raising your centre column by the same amount. As far as I recall, 4 fingers at the first knuckle worked fine for me.

    Cheers,

    R.
    I don't doubt you're right for general use. My wife uses a C330 for macro pictures of archaeological artefacts, where retaining the exact composition is more critical. She swears by the paramender. I just swear at it, as I have just never got the point of TLRs, but each to their own :-)

    David.

  3. #13
    Pragmatist's Avatar
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    The Yashica TLR's also have a close-up set of lenses that are available as OEM and off-brand models. Every set that I have seen includes automatic parallax correction in the viewfinder lens...
    Cheers,

    Patrick

    When you come to a fork in the road, take it...

  4. #14

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    The czech Flexarets have parallax corrected closeup lenses (the Flexpars) which are really good in my experience. But, frustratingly, absolutely no parallax indication at all when shooting without the closeup lenses.

  5. #15

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    The only way to _correct_ parallax is to move the taking lens to the position of the viewing lens before making the picture. Tilting the camera to adjust the framing using guides, or using close-up lens sets with a prism on the viewing lens to adjust the framing does not do this. For flatish subjects this compensation works, but for subjects with depth you cannot view the relative positions of the subject components as seen by the taking lens.

    I have a close-up set that lives with my Yashicamat, and it is often useful. But it does not compare to the Paramender when doing accurate table-top compositions.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  6. #16

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    There is a Mamiya Parallax corrector on ebay, currently no bids with a $0.98 USD start price. Ends Mar 7

    http://cgi.ebay.com/MAMIYA-TWIN-LENS...QQcmdZViewItem

  7. #17

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    First model with knob wind to raise the camera for the shot.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    I think it was called a Paramender. You can of course achieve exactly the same effect, a good deal cheaper, by raising your centre column by the same amount. As far as I recall, 4 fingers at the first knuckle worked fine for me.

    Cheers,

    R.
    The distance on center between the taking and viewing lenses of the Mamiya TLR cameras is exactly 50 mm. I have a Paramender that I use once in a while for very close up work. Obviously, it's not very useful unless the camera is mounted on a tripod. I think the OP might have been thinking more along the lines of using the camera hand held for tightly cropped portraits. In that sort of application, you can be close enough to your subject for parallax to become an issue.

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