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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    My suggestion:

    Put together the kits you are considering in the bags you would be carrying them in.

    Then consider what else you intend to carry with you (suitcases etc.). If possible, do a trial "pack".

    That will give you a comparative sense of what you are up against.

    In my experience, due to the bellows focusing, a C220 with three lenses and a small meter isn't a huge amount heavier than a 35mm SLR with three lenses, but it certainly is a bit bulkier. The film takes up more space too.

    Does your wife take photographs? Could you meet your needs with both formats, and fewer lenses (e.g. wider lenses for the 35mm)?

    In most of my travel photography, I've used 35mm, and shot slide film. If I intended to shoot B & W, I'd take my C220 or my M645.

    If I were to take my C220, I'd use a 65mm and 135mm tandem. The 55mm is nice, but relatively slow. I'd also use my monopod, rather than a tripod, but my monopod does include a light-weight tripod accessory inside it.

    Matt

  2. #12

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    I don't think you're crazy.

    You don't have to carry all lenses all the time.

    When we lived in Europe, my normal travel camera was an Iskra. OK, so it's smaller than the C220, but the fixed lens never really had me wishing for extra lenses - you work with what you have. You never regret having the extra film size. Being a TLR you can handhold it to quite slow speeds too.

    In the wintertime I would load the camera up with TriX and shoot it at 400 (to dev in Rodinal) or 1000 if I was going to dev it in Diafine.

    Take a wide (55mm) and the standard lens, & if you've still got a bit of room left, take a tripod. If you've still got some room left, take the telephoto or a small P+S camera.

    Enjoy your trip!

  3. #13
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It's all relative. If I'm going mainly for photography, I might take my 8x10" or 4x5". If it's just travel snaps, then probably my Bronica S2a kit or possibly 4x5" with plans of using it handheld much of the time. 35mm? That's just for the birds (with my 600/4.5).
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #14
    Curt's Avatar
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    This one is so easy I skipped over the answers. I went to Paris a year ago November with my wife and son. I took a mamiya 645 and my son took my nikon f3hp. He printed his and they were fine for the 35mm size. I helped him print them full frame on 8x10.

    I printed mine on 8x10 and I used a tripod when ever possible and they were very nice. No grain, sharp, smooth, well very nice. When he had a chance to see what I did on 120 and what he did on 35mm he said to me that he wished he had taken a larger format. He was 17 when he came to this conclusion.

    My advice is to use the largest format you can practically use, in your case that would be the Mamiya C220. I would suggest that you put a tripod in your suitcase and carry on the camera. You will never regret taking the larger format.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  5. #15

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    take it! i travel with my rb all the time. if your wife is patient and you like printing 6x6 over 35mm, it seems like you answered your own question.

    like the above poster stated, you meet a lot more people taking a camera like that. tis could help you get into places you may not have be able to go.

    eddie

  6. #16
    eddym's Avatar
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    Let me put it this way...
    After you get back and print your 35mm negs, how will you feel when you look at the prints and think, "boy, this would have really looked great if I had shot 120!"?
    Me, I hauled a Linhof Technika 70 with 3 lenses around Venice. The shot I got of the Grand Canal just before sunset was incredible.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  7. #17

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    I have faced the dilemma before.
    I have travelled with SLR-system for colour slides and with a 6x6 Ikonta for black&white. Some 35mm lenses were never used on these trips.
    Nowadays I would take a pocket-sized 35mm camera and Mamiya with 55 or 65mm and a monopod. Would take some fast and some really fast 120-film.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM1977 View Post
    The goal of the trip is to see and experience Europe.
    Which means enjoying the surroundings and the people instead of being glued to a camera. There is no more painful sight than tourists in Paris who have flown thousands of miles so that they can play pack mule to half their belongings and spend a good part of their time seeing the city, when they aren't looking at a map, through a lens. A lot of these people look cranky, and for good reason.

    London and Paris, especially Paris, are walking cities, and both cities get a lot of rain. Figure that on at least some days you or your wife are going to have to carry an umbrella. How much other stuff do you want to carry when you are on foot for the better part of a day?

    Personally, in either of those cities: no camera bag (shoulder bags are a nuisance after awhile, and a pain in crowds, such as on the Metro), one camera, one lens, used sparingly. The remaining question: will your Minolta fit in a coat pocket and, if so, are you prepared to leave it behind in favour of walking around for several hours a day with a four pound weight tethered around your neck? Maybe yes, maybe no. If yes, give your neck a break and take along a small (emphasis small) backpack.

    I say this as a former resident of Paris who has spent plenty of time in London. I have used a Mamiya rangefinder in both cities, with one lens, but I wouldn't carry the Mamiya for an entire day, unless there were going to be a lot of stops at cafes. Speaking of which, one suggestion. Don't hesitate to quit walking, and pop into a cafe, or call it quits for the day, if you feel tired. This should be a romantic holiday and a great cultural experience, not an endurance contest When I said that one sees a lot of cranky tourists in Paris (and for that matter London), I was serious. People think that they have to see everything, and that they have to carry enough stuff to survive a 20 mile hike, and they wind up looking miserable.

    As for photographic quality, it seems to me that there are some pretty good pictures of Paris taken with 35mm cameras. Shots by a fellow named Cartier-Bresson come to mind.
    Last edited by r.e.; 02-25-2007 at 03:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

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    I have traveled a few times with a C220 around Japan with the waist level finder and the 80mm lens only. It worked very well, and I managed some decent shots. Though I missed a built in lightmeter, it worked pretty well.

    Now, when I travel and dont want to carry either an 8x10 or 4x5, it will be with a Mamiya 7, and two or three lenses. Very light, with a built in meter. Slightly more convienent that the C220.

    Hope it helps.

    Gary

  10. #20

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    I'd say that you should bring both the C220 and a fixed lens rangefinder. Leave The C220 at wherever your sleeping when you go out, only taking the C220 only when you think you will need it.

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