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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by reub2000 View Post
    I'd say that you should bring both the C220 and a fixed lens rangefinder. Leave The C220 at wherever your sleeping when you go out, only taking the C220 only when you think you will need it.
    I've decided to do exactly this. I have a tiny Olympus 35RC I can pack as well. Wife will be carrying a tiny digital as well. I don't need to take the C220 everywhere. I'm 29 and still have some endurance (although I feel its slipping away every year!).

  2. #22

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    As an owner of two Mamiya C220 bodies with 5 different focal length lensboards, all I can add to this discussion is my opinion on which lenses would be the most useful to you. The 55mm set is very handy in those tight spaces. Think narrow streets with tallish buildings on either side or anywhere else backing up is a problem. I've heard complaints that these lenses are not the sharpest. Don't let that worry you. They are plenty good enough, if a bit on the slow side compared to lenses with an equivalent angle of view in the 35mm world. It will blow the doors off anything in the 35mm world as well simply because of the larger negative size. Don't forget the 80mm standard lens. I use one of these for over 90% of the time with this camera. The optics are spectacular, and in my opinion it is the best in my collection for this camera. Finally, the 135 makes a dandy portrait lens. I have no complaints about this one either. Comes in handy when you want to isolate your subject from the background or eliminate some of the surroundings.

  3. #23
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Yes. TLR travel is certainly possible

    I echo the thoughts about not bringing it with you all the time. Case the scenes with the comapct 35mm. Plan a day or two to revisit the special sites taking the tlr and by then you know the time of day you want to be at a site. This was the approach with my last trip to NYC.

    Also look up the concept of string tripods; great for stablizing a TLR to handhold it- it adds just the right rigidity for many scenes where tripod photography is a challenge or, where you are going to be hassled. Just an eye bolt, an sash cord with a few knots to keep it from slipping when you step on it.

    I travel with my C330, 65, 80, and 180 lenses, Metz CT60 flash kit, spot meter, cheapo flash meter, and a collapsible 40" white/silver reflector carried in a converted kids rolling nylon school bag. It has a handle that extends so that it can be rolled in most urbal locales. It has backpack straps that allow you to put it on your back where rolling is not an option. It does not look like a camera bag. There are pockets for the filters, film, grey card, business model release forms, mini sample portfolio, compass, leaterman, etc. The inside has been fitted with cut up blue closed cell foam sleeping pad material to pad the affair, and dividers are fabricated from 1/4" foam core board, that is well taped once the final configuration is known. I actually have different divieders depending on whether I want to add SLR instead of TLR to the bag.

    And, yes, using a TLR interests people. See the death valley tread going today for the negative side of interst. If you are in the US, particularly NYC, expect tripod hassles.

    The positive side of interest is that I find I have better sucess doing local people pictures with a TLR, because you can talk to people while you take their pictures; with a waist level finder you are not talking to them with a camera mashed in your face.

  4. #24
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I've outgrown my fear of travelling with a larger camera. I've taken my Hasselblad to Europe several times now, the 4x5 out to California three times, and my latest trip was to Argentina with a 5x7. I have the advantage of travelling alone, so my pace to see and photograph things is entirely my own. That said, shooting with something other than 35mm will definitely draw LOTS of attention to you, most of it positive (I got on Argentinian TV because of the 5x7). I did plan what I was doing on a given day when shooting with the big beast, so I'd second the above advice if you are going multi-format. When I went to Spain, I only brought the one system (the Hassy) and had a great time shooting it, and met some interesting people who were fellow photography buffs because of it.

  5. #25

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    Having faced this dilemma many times, my normal travel pack now includes the C220, 65mm, 135mm, a Z-I Nettar 6x6 folder, Nikon FM2 with 105mm and 35mm lens, and a light meter. All fits nicely into a shoulder pack and the Mamiya has a nice small case that carries just it and the spare lens (and a dozen rolls of film). The Nikon goes without case, spare lens in my jacket pocket.

    Why the 65mm? Dang, what a nice lens. Put the lens hood on it, contrast increases by a stop and there isn't much you can't shoot with it. The 135mm is a fine lens for getting those little architectural tidbits you'll be seeing all over the place. Think gargoyle at Notre Dam.

    Paris is a city of walking (and riding the Metro). Take really good shoes. That's why tourists are so cranky. Have a great time in Europe.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  6. #26

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    I did a similar trip to New Orleans, a month before Katrina hit. Wandered around town on foot and on the trolleys. Carried a camera bag with a Rolleicord V and a Ciro-Flex in it, one with b/w and one with color. No probs.

    When we rode an airboat in the pouring rain (the start of Hurricane Dennis), then I took my Olympus Stylus in a small padded fanny-pack.

    Were I to do the same trip now, I'd probably take my Rolleicord, a Widelux, and the Olympus (has a nice flash, weather resistant, and a zoom). And I'd probably never have more than 2 of the 3 cameras on me, depending on the situation.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter View Post
    Paris is a city of walking (and riding the Metro). Take really good shoes.
    Best piece of advice in the whole thread

  8. #28
    snegron's Avatar
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    I think you will benifit from taking both cameras and leaving one in the hotel room as mentioned above. The smaller 35mm will be great to take daylight shots to see perspective, sort of like a practice or trial run camera. Even your digital camera could be used for this purpose. The 120 would be your "serious" camera when you want to return to a particular spot to capture the image as best as possible.

    Another thing you might want to consider is the film type. Will your 120 film require refridgeration? If so, will your hotel facilitate this? Will you be travelling with large amounts of film, or will you purchase the film at your destination? Will they have the type of film you like? Nowadays 35mm film is more readily available than 120 film.

  9. #29
    kraker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM1977 View Post
    Going to Europe for the first time.
    (...)
    Has anyone traveled with a C220 before?
    My EUR 0,02: I have traveled with a C3 before (at that time only with one lens, though, and always by car, so your considerations may be different). I know I would do it. If you don't want to take it with you on a certain day, just leave it in the hotel room or wherever it is you are staying. Bring your 35mm for these occasions.

    shuttr.net
    -- A sinister little midget with a bucket and a mop / Where the blood goes down the drain --

  10. #30
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    I am a consultant and I typically do extended projects. I did a year in London (4 weeks there, 1 week back) and a year in Korea (8 weeks there, 1 week back). I almost exclusively traveled with 2 cameras: my c220 with the 65mm, 80mm, and 180mm lenses and my Ansco Speedex folder. I used B&W exclusively in the c220 and E-6 in the folder. The folder was always with me in a small belt pack and the c220 went with me on weekends or afternoon & evening photo trips. On one trip I decided to take the Olympus kit with me to Londan rather than the MF and, while I love that camera and lenses dearly, when I look back on the boxes of slides and negatives, I wish I had take the c220 that time, too.

    It is personal opinion for all of us, and mine is that I will always choose MF over 35mm, unless it is absolutely impossible. And, as a result of those experiences, it has to be pretty impossible for me not to take MF & a monopod.

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