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  1. #1

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    Mamiya C330 & Depth of Field

    I love using my Mamiya C330 with one exception, I really miss the ability to set my focus based on "hyperfocal distance focusing".

    If you use a C330 what is your technique / tips / DIY tools etc that you use to ensure what you want in focus will be in focus.

    Thanks

    Todd

  2. #2
    CraigH's Avatar
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    There are depth of field charts in the C-330 manual. Off the top of my head, I can't think of the websites that have the manual on it. I'll post them when I think of them. Hopefully someone else will have the sites.

    Craig

  3. #3
    Blighty's Avatar
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    I have the manual for a C330f. There are DoF charts in there. If you still want them, drop me a PM. Regards, Blights
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for your responses, I do have a copy of the DoF tables. My question is more about your technique in the field when have two areas that you want in focus but are separated by a significant distance. In a studio I could use a tape measure but in the field it is often impractical.

    I was thinking of making a jig to attach to the camera is give a much better estimate that the distance scale provided, which is of minimal use.

    One of the first techniques I learned when I was introduced to photography was the "hyperfocal distance" technique of focusing. But unfortunately the C330 is not really set up for such a technique.

    What techniques do you use in the field?

    Thanks

    Todd

  5. #5
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Barlow View Post
    ... But unfortunately the C330 is not really set up for such a technique...
    Of all TLR's I've seen, the C330 (and C33, and C3) should be the easiest to use this techniqe on?

    Focus on the farthest object. Then focus on the nearest. Then move the focus (the extension) half the way back to the first point.

    With a TLR with bellows, the only thing you don't get is a DoF preview. So you'll need to use tables for that.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #6

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    I have three methods, which I will list in order of probable use:

    1. Experience. One does develop a feel for the DoF with a particular lens/format and distance. At least enough to know when a more rigorous approach is advisable 8-)

    2. Use tables or a DoF calculator. This depends on an accurate distance measurement, which the Mamiya TLR will not give you, to work well. On the other hand, people can learn to judge distances better than the precision with which you can set the camera.

    3. There is a view camera technique that uses the difference in near and far focus points. To use it you need to be able to measure the lens extension change. A millimetre measure can be used to do this, or an inexpensive dial caliper. The range of motion for normal photographic distances (say 4' to infinity) is not much, so your error is likely 5-10%.

    There used to be a device like a dial gauge that measured the extension from the accessory shoe to a plate clamped to the lensboard. It was directly calibrated for distance with the shorter lenses.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  7. #7
    Blighty's Avatar
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    There are a couple of DoF calculators on the web. Once you've entered a value for lens/aperture/format and CoC, the hyperfocal distance will be calculated for you. Under controlled conditions, you could measure, then mark the hyperfocal distances for a given range of F stops on the bellows focussing rail. I have to admit I've never done this for finding hyperfocal distance, but I did use it for accurately calculating flash to subject distance when I used to photograph weddings with the C330 (the bulit in distance indicator being a bit of a joke)
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  8. #8
    FrankB's Avatar
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    I know exactly what you mean and had the same problem when I started using the C330. The focussing scale is pretty much useless and, without an accurate distance measurement, the DoF scales aren't much use.

    You may find it useful to get hold of an optical rangefinder. These are tiny little gadgets that go for around £5 - £15 on eBay and give you a quick and easy distance measurement to objects. They make it a lot easier while you're getting your eye in.

    Hope this helps,

    Frank
    The destination is important, but so is the journey



 

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