Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,749   Posts: 1,483,822   Online: 1073
      
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,318
    Images
    140

    bulb exposures on bronica SQ?

    I've read that it's possible but is it only possible with some lenses?
    The shutter speed dial only goes up to 8 seconds. The sq-a model is what i'm asking about.

    vinny
    Last edited by wildbill; 04-09-2007 at 08:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    papagene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Western Mass., USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,175
    Images
    111
    If I remember my friend's SQa - the lens had a "T" setting for timed exposures. I am sure someone will fill in the blanks correctly on this question.

    gene
    gene LaFord


    Long live Ed "Big Daddy" Roth!!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    "I don't care about Milwaukee or Chicago." - Yvon LeBlanc

  3. #3
    glbeas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Roswell, Ga. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,307
    Images
    109
    Theres a slide switch on the bottom of the lens barrel for switching the lens to bulb exposure. I haven't used it much so I'm not real sure how it's supposed to act.
    Gary Beasley

  4. #4
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    New York, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,251
    Images
    4

    Time (T) Exposure with the Bronica SQ-A

    I have a Bronica SQ-A and this is how the instruction manual describes time exposures with the SQ-A (quoted exactly as it appears):



    "Time exposures are made with the time exposure lever on the lens, regardless of the setting on the shutter speed scale. However, the lever is locked to prevent accidental movement and must be unlocked for use.


    A. Unscrew the set screw on the time exposure lever until further revolution is not possible, which will prevent the lever to be moved freely.

    * Except for time exposures, always shift the time exposure lever so that "A" is visible on the lens barrel and keep it locked with the setscrew to prevent accidental movement.

    B. Next, cock the shutter with the film winding crank and then shift the time exposure lever to the left (looking from the body towards the lens) which will expose a red-colored "T" on the barrel. The shutter will stay open when the shutter release button is depressed in this condition.
    The shutter is closed by shifting the time exposure lever in the opposite direction and exposing the letter "A" once more.
    "



    I hope this helps.

    I haven't used the time exposure function yet on this camera, partly because I think I will cause the camera to shake when I close the shutter by shifting the time exposure lever as described above. So far I've managed with the slowest shutter speed of 8 seconds.


    Best wishes,
    Sanjay

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    6
    As the song says: you can leave your hat on, or a black cloth or simply the lens cap just before switching the A/T lever back. I suppose with times longer than 4 seconds, the risk to shake the camera is very odd.
    The Seiko #0 shutter is driven by an electromagnet drawing the battery all the time the shutter remains opened, if you set 8 seconds it draws current for 8 seconds quickly shorting the battery life, on the other hand using A/T lever the electromagnet doesn’t draw any current.

    Max

  6. #6
    Bob F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,984
    Images
    19
    Some lenses have a screw and some have a button you pull up, but in either case the action is the same as described above: it releases the slider so you can set it to "T". Silly method really, but as said, it stops the battery being depleted during long exposures. If you use it a lot (I don't) a small hood for the lens made out of black felt or similar might be a useful accessory to knock up...

    Cheers, Bob.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin