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  1. #21

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    OK, I obtained a 43mm and really love it, and have been trying out for the past week or so a 150mm loaned to me by a friend.

    I figure for sure I will also get a 150mm.

    Now, can anyone make a good case for also having the 65mm to go along with the 43mm and 80mm? I think not, but would love to hear the case for.

    I have to say, and with all due respect to other quality systems, Letiz, for example, that Mamiya 7 is about the most perfect rangefinder system ever and in terms of image quality just blows everything else out of the water. The leaf shutter design is as quiet (or quieter) than a Leica M rangefinder camera, and the large 6X7cm negative is vastly superior to the best 35mm, and for that matter, to anything digital that sells for less than $20K. So why fool around with digital anything when there is Mamiya 7?

    Sandy King
    Last edited by sanking; 08-03-2007 at 12:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    I have to say, and with all due respect to other quality systems, Letiz, for example, that Mamiya 7 is about the most perfect rangefinder system ever and in terms of image quality just blows everything else out of the water. The leaf shutter design is as quiet (or quieter) than a Leica M rangefinder camera, and the large 6X7cm negative is vastly superior to the best 35mm, and for that matter, to anything digital that sells for less than $20K. So why fool around with digital anything when there is Mamiya 7?

    Sandy King
    I agree the whole system is a gem. As for the 65mm it's a very useful and very sharp general wide angle which shows a lot less of the artificial perspective of the 43mm, which is equivalent of a 21mm in 35mm terms. It is also a lot more forgiving of slight errors in holding the camera exactly level, which can produce some rather odd looking pictures with wider lenses. I use my 43mm a lot, but I use the 65mm even more. I use both more than the 80mm and don't use teles at all. On the very odd occasion when I do need a tele for medium format, I borrow my wife's Mamy C330 which I find focuses more reliably with a long lens, something which can be a weak spot with rangefinders.

    David.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft View Post
    I agree the whole system is a gem. As for the 65mm it's a very useful and very sharp general wide angle which shows a lot less of the artificial perspective of the 43mm, which is equivalent of a 21mm in 35mm terms. It is also a lot more forgiving of slight errors in holding the camera exactly level, which can produce some rather odd looking pictures with wider lenses. I use my 43mm a lot, but I use the 65mm even more. I use both more than the 80mm and don't use teles at all. On the very odd occasion when I do need a tele for medium format, I borrow my wife's Mamy C330 which I find focuses more reliably with a long lens, something which can be a weak spot with rangefinders.

    David.
    Well, I decided to get the 65mm anyway, so now I will have the 43mm, 65mm, 80mm and 150mm. I also bought a second body, primarily to protect against camera failure. I am going to China for a month in September (my first visit there) and the Mamiya 7 system is going to be my main camera as I have decided to not travel with LF.

    My thinking is that because of the superior optics of the Mamiya 7 lenses I can get 4X5 quality, or very close to it, by using the camera at more optimum apertures than would be possible with LF. I will use only color negative film in 220 size on the trip. My plan is to scan the film and print in color or B&W as the scene suggests.

    BTW, the spirit level that is visible through the detachable 43mm viewfinder is a very neat feature. Too bad it is not visible in the main viewfinder when using the 65mm and 80mm lenses.

    Sandy King
    Last edited by sanking; 08-04-2007 at 09:47 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Do you Mamiya 7 users find yourselves hindered by the minimum focus distance on the 150? Are you able to get a fairly close head shot when you want one or is that impossible?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazzy View Post
    Do you Mamiya 7 users find yourselves hindered by the minimum focus distance on the 150? Are you able to get a fairly close head shot when you want one or is that impossible?
    It focuses down to 6 feet, which is close enough for me. If that did not prove to be close enough then I would crop the resulting print.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  6. #26

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    Something else I forgot to say in favour of the 65mm. It's much easier to use with filters than the 43mm. By the way, I agree that the spirit level in the 43mm viewfinder is very useful and east to use. Some others have been quite rude about it, but I have never understood why.

    David.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft View Post
    Something else I forgot to say in favour of the 65mm. It's much easier to use with filters than the 43mm. By the way, I agree that the spirit level in the 43mm viewfinder is very useful and east to use. Some others have been quite rude about it, but I have never understood why.

    David.
    OK, I have the 65mm and exposed a roll of film with it today. One of the sharpest lens I have ever used, without doubt.

    But much larger (in the sense of longer) than both the 43mm and 80mm Mamiya lenses for the 7 series).

    And BTW, I agree with you about the finder for the 43mm. I find it well made and very useful and don't understand some of the very negatives comments expressed earlier? And in particular, the focusing level visible in the accessory finder is one big plus.

    Sandy King

  8. #28
    Maine-iac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    I just bought a Mamiya 711 camera with 80mm lens and am already thinking about other optics. A 150mm lens seems a sure bet, but I would be interested in opinions (pros and cons) re: the 43mm and 50mm wide angle lenses.

    Sandy
    I recently bought one too, after selling several well-loved other pieces of equipment, except I got the 65 and 150 combo with the intent of adding the 43 when I can afford it, which at this rate will be about ten years after I'm dead.

    The 65 is a honey of a lens (approx equivalent to a 32mm for a 35mm camera), and works perfectly well for me as a normal. If you're going to keep the 80 as your normal and are content with a wide angle that is roughly the equivalent of a 28mm on a 35mm camera, then the 50-80-150 would be fine. If you'd like a little more on the wide side, then perhaps trade the 80 for a 65 and go with the 43 on the bottom end. With either the 50 or the 43 you'll need the supplementary finder, so that shouldn't be an issue in the decision.

    Larry

  9. #29
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    I know that I am coming a bit late to the party. My Mamiya 7II consists of the Mamiya 7 43mm, 50mm, 65mm and 150mm lenses. All of the lenses are extremely sharp. The 65mm is the lens that I standardly leave on camera as it is the widest lens that can be used without the ancillary finder. The 50mm may or may not quite as sharp as the 43mm. With both the 43mm and 50mm it is best if possible to use the camera on a tripod and when possible level out the camera to keep lines parallel. Additionally, I keep the Kirk L bracket on the camera all the time to assist in switching from horizontal to vertical when using my Arca type QR heads.

    I am posting 2 photos which were taken recently on my trip to Oregon. Both are in my gallery. The photo of Latourell Falls, Columbia River Gorge, was taken with the 43mm lens on Fujichrome Velvia (50) at approximately f16 at 1/2 sec.

    The second photo was taken at Crater Lake, Oregon (In the Pink)at sunset or into dusk. The colors of the clouds and colors reflected into and turned the snow pink. No filter used. 65mm lens at f11 at 1 Sec on Velvia (50).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails LATOURELLFALLS.jpg   INTHEPINK.jpg  
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  10. #30

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    Terrific system - 50 could still be useful with your outfit

    I have had a Mamiya 7 outfit for 10 years with all of the lenses. As everyone has stated, it is simply a superb system for a careful worker who values wonderful results.

    Sandy, I can even make a case for the 50mm with the outfit you have. There are times when 50 is perfect even with the 43 and 65 in the bag - the subject, distance, impression just look better with the 50. They are small enough that you can carry them easily. My two bodies have been all over Southeast Asia and China; another advantage of the system is that it does not look "expensive" compared to motor-driven, long-lenses super SLR's. I had a driver in Yunnan province ask me what I was doing with such an "old" camera. You can see his cousin in the rock quarry picture in my Asia gallery at www.georgepappas.net.

    I have Verichrome Pan/PMK (now I will test pyrocat) negs that are simply amazing in their tonal quality from this system. It is a unique system.

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