Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,000   Posts: 1,524,342   Online: 767
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 39
  1. #1
    Toffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Point Pelee, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,793
    Images
    121

    Medium Format for landscape

    I know that this has been covered before, but I have to ask. I'm looking to jump into medium format and am a little overwhelmed by the options.

    I'm thinking of a medium format SLR with a metered prism and auto focus if possible.

    I keep seeing the Bronicas and Mamiyas referred to as "wedding cameras". By that, I assume they mean that they are best suited to portrait work. I shoot mainly landscapes and um... things. (flowers, trees, chairs, still-life etc.)
    I'm watching a 645j and 645 1000s, (Manual focus, I know, but both with metered prisms) on e-pay. Would either of these cameras suit my needs?

    Cheers,
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  2. #2
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    Any of those should work fine. I'm not real knowledgeable about MF, perhaps someone else could provide the details. However, I do know that Tim Fitzharris uses a 645. I used to really like his work, until he started using a digital back.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    799

    Jump To Medium Format

    I assume that you are now using 35mm equipment. You will see a definite improvemnt in image quality with a 6X45 negative/slide but medium format equipment is much less handy to use for close-up and macro work. When you get really close you wouldn't be using AF anyway so you won't be mising anything there. Where landscape photography is concerned you would want to use a tripod when possible and use the largest format you can too. The 6X45 format is something of a compromise. It allows you to do some shooting the same way you would with 35mm equipment and it goves you a larger format to work with but it will not give you the same quality for large landscape prints that you would get with the 6X7 format. Mamiya and Bronica was popular for wedding photos but will also work nicely for other types of shooting.

    Medium format stuff is very cheap now so try the 6X45 format and see how it suits you. If you don't get the quality you are looing for in the landscape work just trade it towards a 6X7 outfit. I use 6X45, 6X6 and 6X7 Bronica cameras and they are all nice. If you are shooting color neg or slide film in medium format make sure to have it scanned properly or you won't see any improvement over 35mm.

  4. #4
    jovo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,082
    Images
    189
    You might want to reconsider your interest in auto focus for landscape work. After all, the 'scape isn't going anywhere and you have lots of depth of field options to play with manually. If you're not including much foreground, infinity focus is about as easy to find as can be. If you are including foreground and want everything sharp, you'll need to be very precise with depth of field and f stop which is easy to do with the scale on the lens. Finally, you have far more manual focus options in MF than with auto focus including bigger (6x7 or 6x9) negatives.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    799
    Make that gives.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    491
    The wedding camera reference was probably a carry over from the days when most wedding photographers used mf gear & the Bronica and Mamiya equipment was less expensive then the Hassleblad gear.

    I use a Bronica SQb (non-metered so I use a hand held meter) for shooting landscapes and find it a perfect fit for me. There is a good selection of lenses and accessories (other than waist-level finders) available and at reasonable prices.

    The Mamiyas represent a good value as well. While mf prices seem to have leveled off, maybe even gone up a bit, they represent an excellent value.

    God luck,

    Bob

  7. #7
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Henrico, Virginia USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,604
    Images
    32
    Most of what I shoot is landscape scenes and I use both a Mamiya RB67 and a Mamiya 645 1000s (I have a metered prism for both). Lots of good lenses available for both of those two. Honestly though, you can't really go wrong with either Mamiya or Bronica. Just choose the size negative you want to go with and that'll narrow your choices.
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  8. #8
    Toffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Point Pelee, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,793
    Images
    121
    Thanks for the advice so far. Yes, I'm coming from 35mm; having used and loved my Nikon N80 for the last few years. I know that 6X7 is well suited to landscape, but I don't think I can get a negative holder that size for my (cheap) enlarger. I've got 35mm and 6X6. Manual focus is not a deal breaker, but I would really appreciate on-board metering.

    BTW, I use a tripod for most work anyway, so that is not a big deal.

    Thanks again.
    Last edited by Toffle; 07-01-2007 at 01:34 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    If it was me.

    Start with a waist finder. For landscape you don't need the speed of a metering prism. I also find you "see" more with a waist finder. A handheld meter isn't going to cost much [any?] more then any of the better metering prisms.

    Look for a model with mirror up. Even if you don't use it that often.

    Off the top of my head I think the two Mamiya 645s you mentioned are older models. You don't save much money in todays market going too old.

    Surf over to www.keh.com and see what they have. The Bronica ETRSI stuff has gone pretty sparse lately and prices are up but even so it'll likely be cheaper then Ebay and better quality.

    If you can handle the weight/size issues you might want to consider a RZ/RB. Sounds like you don't mind a tripod?

    I think the wedding bit relates to the feature set. Removable backs,metering,TTL flash,winders etc. Being system cameras you can often pick the features you want/need.

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,174
    Images
    20
    An attraction of 6x6, even if you don't shoot square, is that you can crop to a rectangle from any part of the frame. If you crop a horizontal shot from the top 2/3 of the frame, for instance, that's like having front rise on a view camera--at least for horizontals. Likewise, you can imitate view camera shift by cropping verticals from the left or right side of the frame.

    For landscapes and still life, you'll probably find yourself focusing manually most of the time anyway, so I wouldn't bother with autofocus.

    Also, bear in mind that second-hand enlargers and enlarging lenses are very cheap these days, and the RB67 system is a particularly good bargain, so you all together, you could put together a nice 6x7 system for not too much money.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin