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  1. #21
    Kim Catton's Avatar
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    Søren, Im not a member of a photoclub, but ive been lucky ass well. All my darkroom equipment has been given to me for free or at very very friendly prices. Meopta Magnifix - ill be checking that one out, as I will with the Manfrotto 055 tripod. Arca Swiss Z1 and B1, is this names of tripod heads?

    regards

    kim

  2. #22

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    kim...

    i've used the bronica sq-a system for a while and switched over to a hasselblad only resently. i find it only slightly less quality than the hasselblad. you can get a wide range of lenses, but you won't have a meter. it's extremely user friendly and has a mirror lock, it's lighter than many MF cameras out there, interchangable backs that come cheap, not to mention you can find a bornica sq-a plus a 50, 80 150 lens combo and a few backs on ebay for the price you're looking at.

    if you're really looking into a spotmeter, you might want to buy one seperately as you might get the format bug and buy a large format camera within the year (and they don't come with spotmeters).

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Catton View Post
    Søren, Im not a member of a photoclub, but ive been lucky ass well. All my darkroom equipment has been given to me for free or at very very friendly prices. Meopta Magnifix - ill be checking that one out, as I will with the Manfrotto 055 tripod. Arca Swiss Z1 and B1, is this names of tripod heads?

    regards

    kim
    Yes the B1 and Z1 are tripod heads. There is this online mag called Magnachrom. You have to subscribe but it wont cost you anything. The magazine is actually quite good and in the last edition there was a test of ballheads. You might want to take a look.
    Kind Regards
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  4. #24
    Kim Catton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordanstarr View Post
    kim...

    i've used the bronica sq-a system for a while and switched over to a hasselblad only resently. i find it only slightly less quality than the hasselblad. you can get a wide range of lenses, but you won't have a meter. it's extremely user friendly and has a mirror lock, it's lighter than many MF cameras out there, interchangable backs that come cheap, not to mention you can find a bornica sq-a plus a 50, 80 150 lens combo and a few backs on ebay for the price you're looking at.

    if you're really looking into a spotmeter, you might want to buy one seperately as you might get the format bug and buy a large format camera within the year (and they don't come with spotmeters).
    I really have no problem with a seperate meter.. Up until now ive spotmetered with my nikon f80 when using my medium format camera(the one i have now), and yes... the format bug. hehe. I know what you mean. How is the bronica lenses compared to Mamiya?

    Søren, thanks a lot.. will take a look at that magazine

  5. #25
    Kim Catton's Avatar
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    By the way... Ive been looking at the Mamiya 645 - What are these like compared to the rz67 series? Can the two be compared?

  6. #26
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    I don't really think you can compare them, they handle very differently. Maybe you could tell us more about your shooting style and what subjects interest you...

    The best piece of advice I can give is to get these cameras in your hands for a weekend and try 'em out. You will see that they are quite different in every respect.

    The 645 system features some faster lenses (there is a manual 80/1.9) and with the AF bodies you do get semi-decent AF, that may be an issue for you. If you are interested in long tele (sports, wildlife) then 645 would be a better choice, if you want to go wide then larger formats almost always win. Yes you can shoot 645 on a 67 camera but it's really not optimal in terms of lens performance aand that's a helluva lot of gear to transport for that purpose. I think I'd much rather shoot 67 with a 2x TC onto 67 film than crop into the neg or chrome by using a 645 back.

    I like 6x7 systems because of the rotating back and, of course, the much larger negs and slides. Also, bellows focusing has its advantages, especially if you want to do macro. But indeed the 67 bodies are hefty.

    My favourite mamiya is the mamiya 6 RF, but it is quite specialized. An rb or rz is an all-round workhorse. Same goes for the 645s, only they handle very differently from the rb and rz.

    I shot 645 for a while and I like the 35mm-esque handling of it, but I love rotating back 6x7. And there is a 6x8 back for the rb, by the way. Technique being equal, my own feeling is a 6x7 chrome made with one of the better mamiya lenses can seriously rival 4x5" for any reasonable enlargement. (I leave it to you to decide the meaning of "reasonable")
    Last edited by keithwms; 08-24-2007 at 09:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Catton View Post
    By the way... Ive been looking at the Mamiya 645 - What are these like compared to the rz67 series? Can the two be compared?
    No. Twice the image area (nearly -- well, all right, 55-60 per cent more); vast differences in weight (I had an RB67 when my wife had a 645); the 645 is sort of 'super 35mm' while the RB/RZ are nearly as big as LF. It's not just the image quality: the way you use the two cameras will also affect the style of pictures you take, just as will the choice between a rangefinder camera and a reflex.
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  8. #28

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    If you factor in the weight of lenses an RZ is heavier then many LF cameras. I bet my RZ with the biggest lens isn't much lighter then my 8x10 with a light weight lens. That's with the WL finder on the RZ. The prisms I guess would add even more weight.

  9. #29
    Kim Catton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    I don't really think you can compare them, they handle very differently. Maybe you could tell us more about your shooting style and what subjects interest you...

    The best piece of advice I can give is to get these cameras in your hands for a weekend and try 'em out. You will see that they are quite different in every respect.

    The 645 system features some faster lenses (there is a manual 80/1.9) and with the AF bodies you do get semi-decent AF, that may be an issue for you. If you are interested in long tele (sports, wildlife) then 645 would be a better choice, if you want to go wide then larger formats almost always win. Yes you can shoot 645 on a 67 camera but it's really not optimal in terms of lens performance aand that's a helluva lot of gear to transport for that purpose. I think I'd much rather shoot 67 with a 2x TC onto 67 film than crop into the neg or chrome by using a 645 back.

    I like 6x7 systems because of the rotating back and, of course, the much larger negs and slides. Also, bellows focusing has its advantages, especially if you want to do macro. But indeed the 67 bodies are hefty.

    My favourite mamiya is the mamiya 6 RF, but it is quite specialized. An rb or rz is an all-round workhorse. Same goes for the 645s, only they handle very differently from the rb and rz.

    I shot 645 for a while and I like the 35mm-esque handling of it, but I love rotating back 6x7. And there is a 6x8 back for the rb, by the way. Technique being equal, my own feeling is a 6x7 chrome made with one of the better mamiya lenses can seriously rival 4x5" for any reasonable enlargement. (I leave it to you to decide the meaning of "reasonable")

    Ok, well... What I do most is "non-spontaneous" photography. I do a lot of portrait and a lot of night photography and nature as well.. I love to take the time and compose my photos. I do a lot of tripod and love long exposures. For concerts an spontanenous stuff I use my trusted nikon F80. I love 6x6 by the way. Hope this info can be useful in the quest to advice me

    Best regards,

    Kim

  10. #30

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    The RZ is great on a tripod. With the waistlevel finder and the rotating back it can't get much better.

    You can always finder a bigger enlarger -) Or I guess you can compose for the middle 6x6 of the 6x7 frame and print it 6x6.

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