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  1. #11
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I'd go with the Hasselblad- yes, they do break down like any other camera, but they're incredibly robust and reliable. And you can find their gear used for a fraction of what it used to sell for. I had my Hassy kit for well over a decade, and it was very reliable. I did have to get my old 500C body repaired, but it had been used professionally by several wedding photographers before me, and was over 30 years old when it went bad (I believe it was made in 1963).

  2. #12

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    You can certainly get 20x24 prints from Hasselblad or Rollei negatives, even with the necessary cropping. However, I'm sure you realize there will be a bit more grain than from rectangular format cameras. Or, you can adopt the square format for enlargement.
    Of the two, the Hasselblad is probably better for availability of lenses and accesories. The Hasselblad's slide interlock is mechanical, and doesn't depend on a specific type of back.
    OTH, a friend has a Mamya MF rangefinder, and produces amazing results with it. In his landscapes, you can practically count the pine needles in trees that are a KM away. He doesn't care for the reflex cameras because they tend to require retrofocus design lenses.
    I recommend that you go to a camera show, or a well stocked shop and try out a few of the suggestions and see what fits the way you like to work.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel-OB View Post
    I make 16x20 and 20x24 prints, so need 56x70 mm negative.
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    Pentax 67 I think will take me no where due to bad lenses.
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  4. #14

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    Are CFi lenses for Hassy still in production?

  5. #15
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I believe that is accurate- check on the Hasselblad website for more specific information about their product line.

  6. #16
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    I'd recommend looking at the Bronica cameras before you shell out the big bucks on Hasselblad. Mine have traveled three continents with me on shoots and workshops, and I have never had a single problem with either of them. They also cost a fraction of what Hasseys do, and the glass is excellent.

    I realize there are those who like the weight of the Hassey, but IMO that's not a good enough reason to spend so much more money.

    Bronica went out of business, so you can only get the equipment used, but they are built solidly enough for that not to be a major deterrent, at least for me. Both my Bronicas were bought secondhand.

    - CJ

  7. #17
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    If you shoot 6x6 at ~ISO 400 and crop to 645, you will have substantially more b&w grain at 11x14" and up than if you shoot straight to 6x7. It may not matter at ISO 100 but at 400 you will already see it.

    I shoot 6x6 on the mamiya 6, which takes three of the best lenses money can buy (albeit several stops slower than the hassie SLR offerings, which is fine for RF but not fine for portrait SLR work). Anyway I feel totally comfortable with 20x24 enlargements from 6x6 cropped to 645, but compared to what I get from 6x7 or 6x8 or 6x9... well there simply is no comparison. It has nothing to do with resolution, the real issue is grain and the role it plays in the tonality. Now, if you shoot slides or chromogenics then grain may not be an issue, but with traditional b&w, you will see the difference quite obviously. Also note that with 6x7 you can get quite usable polaroids that are great for proofing and even miniprints.

    Just swallow your pride, get the RZ fixed, and enjoy it! The RB and RZ can deliver results rivaling 4x5". In fact, people do even adapt the RB/RZ lenses for 4x5 work. Seriously Daniel, just take a shot of bourbon, calm down, and think this through carefully. Don't make a rash decision on the fly! You can't jump to 645 or whatever just because one back screwed you over on your first shoot. I have something like 12 cameras (at last count) and it took me a roll or two of film with each of them to learn the quirks and feel comfortable. In the long run, the eccentricities of a camera system are like the personality of an old friend.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #18
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    In the long run, to insure your system is up and running 100% of the time if you are working professionally, you should have at least two bodies. As has been noted, it would be cheaper for you to stick with your current system and just get another RZ or RB body so if your main one goes down, it takes 2 minutes to fetch the 2nd, swap out the lens and film back, and keep rolling. Same thing with film backs. Just get a couple of spares.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    I feel totally comfortable with 20x24 enlargements from 6x6 cropped to 645, but compared to what I get from 6x7 or 6x8 or 6x9... well there simply is no comparison. It has nothing to do with resolution, the real issue is grain and the role it plays in the tonality. Now, if you shoot slides or chromogenics then grain may not be an issue, but with traditional b&w, you will see the difference quite obviously.
    I'm really skeptical of this, Keith (specifically 6x6 cropped to 645 versus 6x7). Enlarging the long side to 24 inches is a 10.2-fold enlargement from 6 cm and an 8.7-fold enlargement from 7 cm. You really feel like there's "no comparison"? Compare that to 4x5, in which it's a 4.8-fold enlargement.

    Mathematically 645 and 6x7 are far closer to each other than either one is to 4x5 (which is about 10x13cm). I'd be suprised if many people could tell the difference between the 645 and 6x7 in a blinded comparison.
    Paul

  10. #20

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    [QUOTE=Cheryl Jacobs;512024

    Bronica went out of business, so you can only get the equipment used, but they are built solidly enough for that not to be a major deterrent, at least for me. Both my Bronicas were bought secondhand.

    - CJ[/QUOTE]

    Not exactly. Tamron [the company that made Bronicas last] stopped production. But I'm fairly sure they still are providing service parts etc. At least until they run out.

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