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  1. #1

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    Which Hasselblad?

    I'd like, eventually, to get a Hasselblad for head and shoulder portraits, both in a studio environment and on location. I'll probably get a 150mm lens, as I already have a Rollei TLR with a 75mm lens, a Fuji GSW690III, and a Fuji GS670III. I'm looking for opinions as to which model body and lens I should look for.

  2. #2
    david b's Avatar
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    what is your budget?

    Got $1000? Get a 500cm and a 150mm CF

    Got $2000? Get a 501cm and a 150mm CFi.

  3. #3
    DrPablo's Avatar
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    For $1000 you could get a 500cm with the 150 CT* and 80/2.8 CT*

    I've never used the CF, but I can't say enough good things about the CT* version. It's a truly gorgeous lens.
    Paul

  4. #4
    Struan Gray's Avatar
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    When I dropped my beloved Kowa on a rock last summer found a 3-lens 2000-series kit going for a good price and snapped that up instead of trying to find a reliable new Kowa body. The 150 f2.8 F is just gorgeous wide open (as is the 250 f4 if you like more compression). Stopped down it is still excellent, but busy backgrounds can fragment badly because of the pentagonal aperture - but that's going to be a problem with any Hasselblad lens.

    The F-lenses seem stupidly cheap (except the 110 f2) at present, and 2000 bodies likewise. If you can live with the 1/90 flash sync it's a great way to get a full kit on a budget.

  5. #5

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    For head and shoulders portraits you might need an extension ring as well. Around 8 mm should suffice.

    You can see two portraits in my APUG gallery shot with the 150 sonnar CT*. Both with 8 mm ext. ring.
    Be careful his bow tie is really a camera
    timeUnit

  6. #6
    climbabout's Avatar
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    hassy lens

    I photographed countless portraits and weddings in the 70's and 80's with the 150mm cf - it's a beautiful lens.
    Tim

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by david b View Post
    what is your budget?

    Got $1000? Get a 500cm and a 150mm CF

    Got $2000? Get a 501cm and a 150mm CFi.
    What's better about the 150mm CFi?

  8. #8
    kb244's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter De Smidt View Post
    What's better about the 150mm CFi?
    Well its got 'i' the lowecase i always makes things better... iPod, iDog, iMac...
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.

  9. #9
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    The CFI has the latest lens and coating design (according to zeiss), longer shutter life, and better wearing materials for the lens mount.

  10. #10

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    Hello Peter,

    Nothing wrong with the good 'ole 500C/M. If you want/need the gliding mirror to avoid vignetting of the focussing screen when using longer lenses, like the 250CF, then you'll have to move to a more recent version of the 5xx series. I've always preferred this series due to its all mechanical nature...I used to shoot quite a bit in VERY cold weather.

    The "i" version is supposed to be "improved." Years ago I did a rather informal test between my 150CF and a friends 150CFi (bare branches against winter sky type of thing) and I couldn't see any difference in the final print at the sizes I typically printed to.

    Good luck with whatever decision you make.
    Regards,
    Alan Huntley
    www.silverscapephoto.com

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