Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,929   Posts: 1,585,251   Online: 1001
      
Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 80

Thread: hand-held MF?

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,337
    Hi Janet
    What kind of subjects are you shooting and what filmspeed are you using?
    Why are your 35mm shots better than your MF shots? camera shake? Blur caused by moving subject? Timing? Is it due to the MF gear being inapropiate for the kind of shooting you are doing? Try to specifuy the problem a bit more and perhaps do some analysis of it.
    Kind regards
    Søren
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,337
    Quote Originally Posted by erl View Post
    Without being too obvious, are you holding the Blad correctly? This is pretty important to achieve steady release. I have worked most of my life with Blad as the only work tool, and most of that handheld. Yes, you can spoil some pics, but I always blame the operator (me) for most of that. Understanding which lenses will go "how slow" in your hands is vital. Do not exceed the reality, or suffer. I actually find currently that I spoil more pics with my Leica, because I tend to push the limits, than I do with the Blad simply because I understands its limits better. So often, failure is the responsibility of the photographer rather than the camera.

    The attached image taken very recently was handheld using a 150mm @ about 1/90th sec. Too slow in my estimation, but I got away with it! Normally, I would opt for a min. handheld at 1/250th.
    Seems like you beat me to it
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    531
    Images
    133
    Hi Janet,

    as a rule of thumb the shutter should not be slower than the reciprocal of the focal length of the lens. It's the absolute minimum! Better have the half of it.
    So have at least 1/160 with the 80mm and 1/300 with the 150mm (the closest approximation will be 1/125 and 1/250).
    With cameras without slapping mirror you may get away with much slower speeds. You will have to use TLR or RF cameras then. YMMV though.
    Using a monopod can improve your pictures by far without loosing much of the convenience of handheld shooting. I'd suggest to give this a try first. It is the least expensive way to go.

    cheers

    Ulrich

  4. #14
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,951
    Janet,

    If you use a 45 degree prism, your Hassy will gain more stability from the contact with your head.

    Faster film, faster shutter speed, lower f/numbers, ... the usual suspects.

    Or you can send your Hassy to me, where it will have a good home and get feed lots of healthy film.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    san jose, ca
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,564
    Images
    77
    Lots of good advice. To get back to your original question, I shoot a rb67. That's not the answer to your question. When I go out shooting hand held, I have used the rb with the 50mm lens and have gotten good results. More often I will use my c220 with a 65mm lens. That's not the answer either. Too big and awkward. When I am out with my daughters, just playing tourist, I often use a zone focus 6x6 folder. That's not the answer either. It's not a professional camera, just a lot of fun and takes great photos.

    The answer is... A Rollieflex 600X sitting on a pistol grip with the strap around your neck. It's an amazingly well balanced camera with superb optics. I don't own one, money being what it is, but I have tested them and it would be on the short list of perfectly designed cameras from an ergonomic point of view.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  6. #16
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,487
    Images
    20
    Pistol grips are very much underrated for boxy medium format cameras. I have one for my Bronica S2a, and it makes for a very stable package with a prism finder (it's awkward, though, with the WLF)--like a small movie camera.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #17
    gr82bart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Culver City, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,224
    Images
    37
    Janet,

    I handhold my Hasselblad 503CW with the CW Winder and PME45 prism. Very ergo, very stable. I don't know what model you have, but if it's a CW or CXI model, try it with the CW Winder and you will feel and see the difference.

    Regards, Art.
    Last edited by gr82bart; 10-08-2007 at 03:05 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: My spelling lately has been terrible!
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  8. #18
    tac
    tac is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Appalachia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    246
    I've hand-held my RZ67 a couple times, for street photography; lightened it up as much as possible, 65mm w/ rubber hood, and waistlevel- end result is, it's still a honking big, heavy camera. I don't do that any more.

    Then I borrowed a friend's Mamiya 7; if you like RF's at all- I think this is the hottest film camera to come down the pike in years. I have small hands, and it fits like a well worn glove, controls where I want them, and beautiful sharp lenses. Not cheap, but neither are hassy's.

    If you can arrange for a test-run with a Mamiya 7/7II, would encourage you to try it. The Mamiya 6 is probably the same, but I don't know that; might also be worth looking into.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    531
    Images
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Pistol grips are very much underrated for boxy medium format cameras.
    I have one for my SL66. It is practically unusable without it handheld. I usually screw it onto my monopod when I cannot use a tripod. I prefer to use a TLR when I can get away with normal focal length tough.

    Ulrich

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,344
    I second the suggestion of a monopod. Relatively inexpensive and easy to use. A pistol grip is a good idea, too, but not as sturdy as the monopod. I almost never handhold a MF. I own a Hasselblad, a Rollei TLR and a Fuji 6x9. The Fuji is the only one remotely close to handholdable for me, and then only with fast film. I'm just a bit too unsteady to pull it off.

    Adding flash is a good way to help cut the shake as well. If you're photographing people, flash + ambient light will improve your sharpness and can add that "artistic" blur on long exposures. It also will increase the bulk you're trying to handhold . . .

    Peter Gomena

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin