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  1. #11
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I let the subject matter dictate the cropping whether it is square or a narrow rectangle. I move in the easel bands until the composition works best. The downside is that I have to cut my own mats for each print.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #12

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    The way I see it, every camera implies a set of constraints. Rather than cropping to fit a vision, I tend to just try to fit the constraints of my camera. If it's the rolleiflex I look for square compositions. If it's 4x5, more rectangular. If 35mm - longer rectangles. If I ever get a pano back or format camera I'll start thinking of and looking for panoramic compositions.

    Sometimes I do have a specific shot in mind that requires a specific aspect ratio but usually I find my "vision" can be adapted to the format. If not I'll shoot with a crop in mind - but I mean, my lens is a constraint, my film availability is a constraint, etc, so I usually work within them.

    Maybe that makes me a crappy photographer - maybe not? Dunno.
    Last edited by walter23; 10-21-2007 at 01:13 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
    .

  3. #13

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    I make exposures that encompass all the viewing area, plus some margin, that I need in the final print. I then crop to what I think works best for the print. I don't let a camera's internal framing size dictate the final dimensions of my prints. For example, today I took numerous exposures in the field with a 6x6 camera. My final prints, I can almost guarantee, will not be square. I cannot predict the dimensions of the final prints while shooting in the field. I would make that determination after evaluating several test prints.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  4. #14
    Curt's Avatar
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    Brett Weston used a Rollei 66 but the final photographs are not square. See the Art Wright video and you will see what I mean. Did he use Agfa Pan 25 and crop to suit? Wouldn't that be a 645 negative size?

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  5. #15

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    When I shoot square, I almost always print square.

    On the odd occassion (when using one of my 6x6 cameras) I'll crop a shot, but I'll have already decided on the "print" format before taking the shot.

  6. #16

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    to crop or not to crop

    I print square and never crop any thing. If I can't get it 'in camera', then I discard the image. Walker Evans cropped a lot, as shown in a book I have on his work.

  7. #17
    Leon's Avatar
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    full frame, crop, square, rectangle - whatever it takes.

  8. #18
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I TRY to work to the margins of my format, whatever it is. 99% of the time this means my final print is the same proportions as the negative. On the odd occasion, I will crop, especially if shooting in the studio and the format's negative space ends up being too much. When shooting larger LF sizes, though, I don't crop, and I compose to the very margins of the frame, because I can't crop in the printing stage- I contact print all my 5x7 and larger negatives. I think in the end it makes for better discipline because you have to work harder and think more carefully about what you're shooting BEFORE you trip the shutter.

  9. #19

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    for years i didnt' crop.
    i printed full frame (less rebate lines)
    and i still do in many cases.
    but after printing a portfolio cropped ...
    some 35mm, some 6x6, some 4x5, some 5x7 ...
    i broke out of a the habit.

    break whatever rules you have made for yourself, that is why they are there.

  10. #20
    eddym's Avatar
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    For me, the great thing about the square format is that it leads to this conversation. It gives the photographer the option of composing, shooting, and printing a square photograph... or not. Personally, I usually make that decision at the moment of shooting. I usually "think" in terms of filling a square format when I shoot my Rolleis but if, for example, I am shooting a building, and by composing the shot with the building in the upper area of the negative and cropping the foreground, then I can eliminate converging vertical lines, as if I were using a view camera with a rising front. It's a very practical, flexible format.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

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