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  1. #41
    Rolleijoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wooten View Post
    I think my old Rollei has an optar or opton lens, I ll dig it out and check. I have always been happy with the results, have nt used it for color however.
    The Optars were 1st generation lenses. I used to have an older Rollei from the '30s that had one. It definitely wasn't made for color film, and worked best with older technology films such as Efke 25.

    I imagine the Adox Ortho25 or Rollei Ortho25 should work well with that lens.

  2. #42
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Thanks Joe, I ll dig it out and load it up, have nt used it since the 70's down on Maxwell Street in Chicago, it functions quite well, the camera was used when I got it, my first "big format" it was that and my new Pentax 50 1.4, which also is still operable.
    [FONT="Arial Black"][/FONT]

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshua_G View Post
    Which 6x6 TLR have the sharpest lens?

    Would it have noticeable benefit over Bronica 80/2.8 PS lens?
    .

    In my experience, a Rolleiflex with either a Zeiss Planar or a Schneider Xenotar - I own and use both and they are critically sharp.

    I have no experience with the Bronica lenses - but I would expect them to produce results similar to those produced by the Rollei Planars and Xenotars.

    My Medium Format Fujinon and Mamiya Lenses produce results that are fully equivalent to those produced by my Rollei Planars and Xenotars.

    Incidentally, I took one of my favorite 4x5 color transparencies with an uncoated Zeiss Jena Tessar - sharp, with great color and saturation, (I did use a lens shade).
    Last edited by Tom Hoskinson; 10-29-2007 at 03:42 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo
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  4. #44
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolleijoe View Post
    Rolleiflex Planar (either 3.5E or 2.8 depending on your budget). I use the 3.5E as my main camera, with a Rolleiflex Tessar as backup.

    The Rolleiflex with Xenotar lenses are almost a tie with the Planar. But remember the Xenotar is not to be confused with the Xenar.

    I've shot all the Rolleiflex lenses. I defy anyone to distinguish a difference among images created with Planars and Xenotars. In fact, I doubt that any user would ever be able to see any difference in real-world performance between either of those lenses and the Tessars and Xenars.

    Fretting about which Rolleiflex lens to prefer substitutes fetish for common sense.

    RFXB

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by LazyHammock View Post
    TLRs are portable. As Dan suggests, much of the lens sharpness may be lost handheld depending on the situation.
    For many years I shot Rollei TLR on a monpod and was quite portable and sharp.

  6. #46
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    Hi everyone

    One important thing about sharpness in TLR is the state of the front lens panel and the back. Any shock on them might produce a deformation that makes the lenses not parallel, not aligned, not perpendicular to the film plane, ruining the sharpness because the upper lens won't focus as the lower lens does or the film plane is slightly twisted.

    All my Rolleiflex cameras (2.8F, Wide and Tele) have been controlled after purchase and produce pretty sharp images, even handheld, but I think the maximum sharpness is reached on a tripod at the best aperture of the lens.
    ::: [ jeanba.photo ] ::: [ jeanba.work ] :::

  7. #47
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Sharpest TLR

    [QUOTE=Joshua_G;535471]Which 6x6 TLR have the sharpest lens?

    My ranking would be 3.5 Planar on the Rollei; followed by 3.5 Xenotar; 2.8 Planar; 2.8 Xenotar, fwiw.

    Differences would be miniscule.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  8. #48

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    I vote for Rollei

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	8963FWIW, I have a Rolleiflex 2.8C with the Xenotar lens. I LOVE this camera. I usually use a tripod and cable release like my 4X5 and the images are tack sharp. I really don't know how MF could get any better. Attached is an image taken with it using Kodak Portra 160NC. I used a tripod, cable release and lens shade. I hope this helps.

  9. #49
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Yep those are sharp all right. Just think if you had shot them with a planar you might actually be able to crawl in that airplane.

    I have personally done manic testing with several Rolleis including 2.8E2 Xenotar, 3.5F Xenotar, 3.5 F Planar, 2.8 whiteface Planar, 2.8F white face Xenotar ( I currently have), 2.8FX Planar (I currently have) and 2.8F 60s Planar(my friend has)

    I have had most of these cameras at the same time and did side by side testing on the same films and on the same tripod at the same subjects and the tests always come out the same. Sharpness identical. Contrast: Xenotar slightly more but virtually identical, flare: Planar slightly more but virtually identical.

    I have also done side by side testing in studio with flash of a portrait subject using the White face Xenotar and a Rollei T and you could not tell the slightest difference.

    All the lenses I have tested where in perfect condition.

    Still it is all a matter of opinion and the opinions are generally laced with some sort of personal fondness for one or the other lens for truly unexplainable reasons.

    Dennis

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolleijoe View Post
    The Optars were 1st generation lenses. I used to have an older Rollei from the '30s that had one. It definitely wasn't made for color film, and worked best with older technology films such as Efke 25.

    I imagine the Adox Ortho25 or Rollei Ortho25 should work well with that lens.
    Interesting.

    Optar is a Graflex trade name, AFAIK all of the lenses that bore it were tessar types. Most made by Wollensak, late ones by Rodenstock. Note that Tele Optars are not tessars.

    Opton is a Zeiss Oberkochen trade name, was used in the early '50s while Zeiss Oberkochen and Zeiss Jena were in litigation over rights to the name Carl Zeiss. AFAIK, Optons on Rolleis were all tessars, but I could be mistaken.

    If a Rollei from the late '30s has an Opton lens, the lens is a replacement for the lens that the camera was shipped with.

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