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  1. #21
    Matt5791's Avatar
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    I recently dropped my 500C/M off a wall and it fell 30ft onto hard ground and the odd brick.

    Yes, there was considerable damage - the 250mm sonnar lens actually broke off the camera body; the film magazine looked decidely different and the WLF was completely broken off.

    However with a different lens (the mount on the body was fine) and mag. it still worked, in a manner.

    I know this is extreme, but I considered Bronica before going with Hasselblad and one of the reasons I went with the Hasselblad was becasue it just felt a lot stronger and a lot more resiliant to every day use.

    Whether it is or not I don't know - it just feels that way.

  2. #22
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    The result is what counts.
    The way how you got there is another thing.

  3. #23

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    Something that hasn't been mentioned here. Any, and I mean ANY camera that has electronic functions, rather than mechanical functions will need servicing of the electronics eventually. It is a fact of life that capacitors, which are used in timing circuits in cameras, fail. This is component level electronic repair. Repair centers are used to repairing by replacing sub-assemblies, rather than diagnosing and replacing individual electronic parts. When the supply of repair parts dries up, without concise electronic schematics, individual component diagnosis and replacement becomes next to impossible, and the average camera technician does not have the training to do this anyway. For the long haul, it is wiser to choose a mechanical camera. I am not suggesting brands here, as most medium-format camera brands have had all mechanical models.

  4. #24
    Nokton48's Avatar
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    Something that hasn't been mentioned here. Any, and I mean ANY camera that has electronic functions, rather than mechanical functions will need servicing of the electronics eventually. It is a fact of life that capacitors, which are used in timing circuits in cameras, fail. This is component level electronic repair. Repair centers are used to repairing by replacing sub-assemblies, rather than diagnosing and replacing individual electronic parts. When the supply of repair parts dries up, without concise electronic schematics, individual component diagnosis and replacement becomes next to impossible, and the average camera technician does not have the training to do this anyway. For the long haul, it is wiser to choose a mechanical camera. I am not suggesting brands here, as most medium-format camera brands have had all mechanical models.
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    I want to second this sentiment. I know, that even though I paid more for my "blad system (I have just about 50% of all the available accesories), I -KNOW- that I will always be able to get it repaired. Maybe not by Hasselblad USA, but by -just about- any competant reapir shops. Right now, everybody has plenty of spare parts. And, there are plenty of broken cameras around to be canibalized. That is what David Odess did for me, when my (new to me) 150mm Sonnar (from Adorama Ebay) had a broken rear mount. Turning the focus ring would fire the shutter He cannibalized one from a "parts" lens, so now, mine is as good as new.

    Point is, more 'blads (and parts) are around, than any other system. This may or may not be important to you. It is to me, for the long haul.

    -Dan

  5. #25

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    The 200* series bodies and their faster lenses are the only compelling reasons to buy into a 'blad system over the Bronica (discounting digital backs). All other points are moot.

  6. #26
    jmooney's Avatar
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    QUOTE=Nokton48;540729]Something that hasn't been mentioned here. Any, and I mean ANY camera that has electronic functions, rather than mechanical functions will need servicing of the electronics eventually. It is a fact of life that capacitors, which are used in timing circuits in cameras, fail. This is component level electronic repair. Repair centers are used to repairing by replacing sub-assemblies, rather than diagnosing and replacing individual electronic parts. When the supply of repair parts dries up, without concise electronic schematics, individual component diagnosis and replacement becomes next to impossible, and the average camera technician does not have the training to do this anyway. For the long haul, it is wiser to choose a mechanical camera. I am not suggesting brands here, as most medium-format camera brands have had all mechanical models.
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    I want to second this sentiment. I know, that even though I paid more for my "blad system (I have just about 50% of all the available accesories), I -KNOW- that I will always be able to get it repaired. Maybe not by Hasselblad USA, but by -just about- any competant reapir shops. Right now, everybody has plenty of spare parts. And, there are plenty of broken cameras around to be canibalized. That is what David Odess did for me, when my (new to me) 150mm Sonnar (from Adorama Ebay) had a broken rear mount. Turning the focus ring would fire the shutter He cannibalized one from a "parts" lens, so now, mine is as good as new.

    Point is, more 'blads (and parts) are around, than any other system. This may or may not be important to you. It is to me, for the long haul.

    -Dan[/QUOTE]




    I've thought of this myself and I'm aware of the repair concerns for the electronic cams. I made my living as an electronics bench tech for a while so I'm painfully aware of the vagaries of component level repair.

    My thinking on this as far as the Bronica is concerned is that with the prices as low as they are and what a competent bench tech is worth per hour most components are basically disposable and replaceable via KEH or eBay. This is partly based on the fact that I live off of KEH's BGN rated stuff. For others the numbers may not work the same.

    Jim

  7. #27
    jmooney's Avatar
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    Please keep the thoughts coming if you have any on this subject. I still haven't made a decision yet but I'm leaning toward the Bronica. My sticking points are the Zeiss lenses and not to sound petty or snobbish, because I'm not that way, but the Hassy pride of ownership thingy is still a factor too.

    I have no doubts the Bronny will serve me well. In fact as I sit here I'm looking at a 16X20 of my wife and I on our wedding day that was shot on an ETRSI and it's wonderful, but a Hassy would be cool.....

    Jim

  8. #28
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    The premise of choosing one over the other is ridiculous. Get both.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    The premise of choosing one over the other is ridiculous. Get both.
    Oh were it only that easy...

  10. #30
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The main attractions of the Hassy would be the lenses, ubiquity of used backs and accessories, and ability to rent lenses in major cities.

    The main attractions of the Bronica SQ system would be price, handling (with the lever wind handle and a prism, it feels a lot like a 35mm SLR, and focus is quick), and if you want to go beyond the three lens kit you describe, additional lenses are much more affordable.

    If I wanted just that three lens kit (presuming your budget is not unlimited), with the considerations you're making, I'd probably go with a Hassy. It's that fourth lens, though, that's going to be the pricy one if you want to expand. On the other hand, with the price of Bronica systems these days, you could get your three-lens Hassy, and get a Bronica with an exotic lens, if you decide you need an ultrawide or a long tele, and the lens and body will probably be less than the comparable Zeiss lens for Hassy.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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