Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,533   Posts: 1,572,697   Online: 848
      
Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 63
  1. #1
    Andy K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sunny Southend, England.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,422
    Images
    81

    Hasselblad, Bronica or Mamiya?

    I have been dabbling with mf on and off for a couple of years using an old Agfa Isolette folder. Now I'm thinking to move up a step gearwise. There are many options as far as cameras go.
    My preferences:

    6x6 (I like the square and already have a 6x6 carrier for my enlarger)
    SLR

    I have seen some cameras (these are complete with lens, back and viewfinder), a Hasselblad 500CM, a Bronica SQAi and a Mamiya RZ67 with 6x6 back.

    The thing is I have absolutely no idea what the second hand 'going rate' is for these cameras. What is a reasonable price? Also which is preferable? Are there any quirks or glitches I should look out for?


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    272
    Images
    16
    Hello Andy,
    I can only speak of the Mamiya RZ and the Bronica SQAI. I've got a RZ because the 6x7 format suits me very good. A friend of mine owns a Bronica and it is a lot lighter and smaller. The reason I bought a RZ is for the 6x7 size, possible to add 6x4,5 and 6x6 backs and the super bellows. when you only want to shoot 6x6 maybe the RZ is a bit overkill. bought mine on KEH and some local sellingsites to add a 50mm and a spare back.
    just my 1 eurocent

    Cheers,

    ijsbeer

  3. #3
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Kent, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,364
    Images
    36
    You can't really go wrong with any of the brands you mention, particularly at today's prices. My personal brand loyalty was formed in the 1960s, when Bronica had a reputation for very noisy operation and high vibration levels, so I have never used this brand. I have Mamiya RB67, bought new (for reliability) about 12 years ago because I did not want to pay Hasselblad prices and because I wanted a 100% non-electronic camera (operation at low temperatures).

    Nowadays there is of course so much good secondhand MF gear on the market, you will still pay as much for a Hasselblad wide-angle lens as for a complete camera with standard lens but the price level is lower. I like my Mamiya lenses very much (except for the slight barrel distortion on the 50 mm), I think the Zeiss lenses for Hasselblad are fractionally better but there's not much in it. I think Hasselblad is the most durable brand if you are a very heavy user (hundreds of exposures a day) - I'm not now, so am quite satisfied with Mamiya.

    I leave it to Bronica users to tell you about this brand. I presume technical backup for Bronica will fall by the wayside first, since the brand has ceased to be, but I would think an example of any brand in good condition will stand up to light and careful use more or less indefinitely. In MF, I don't use sophisticated features like motor drive, built-in metering or TTL flash - in this respect, there are many detail differences between models.

    PS: Agree with previous poster, 6x6 cameras are much more compact and portable than Mamiya RB or RZ (or Pentax 67 or any other 6x7).

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,521
    Images
    90
    If 6x6 is your goal, I don't think the RB would be a good choice, only because it's so much larger than the 6x6 cameras though.

    A Hasselblad 500C/M with a waist-level finder, 80 Planar and a back go for around $550 US and up over here. The average price is probably between 600 and 800. The C/M model is newer than the 500C but otherwise quite similar, the primary difference is that the C/M has an interchangeable focus screen that doesn't require tools. On the 500C's and C/M's you will get vignetting in the view finder with lenses 150 mm and longer, the newer Hasselblads have a redesigned mirror that eliminates this. For lenses, parts are no longer available for the "C" series shutters. However the newer lenses are a good bit more expensive. In optics you can choose between multicoated T* and non-multicoated the T* C lenses command a slight bit more money than the non multi-coated. The concensus seems to be that the optical performance is nearly the same. One of the strong points of the Hasselblad is that most accessories, lenses, finders, backs are compataible between the earliest to the latest bodies (the 5xx series anyway).

    If you are not used to the reflex viewing, any of these cameras will throw you off some if you don't use a prism finder, as everything is reversed right to left.

    If you don't need interchangeable lenses, a Rollei is worthwhile to consider too. They are a little lighter than the 6x6 SLR's and perhaps somewhat smaller, and not as complicated.

  5. #5
    SuzanneR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,742
    Images
    139
    I like the 6x7 format, too, and have been shooting with an RZ lately. I have a 6x6 back for it, which is great. It's a very versatile camera, but, as others have said, that might be overkill for only 6x6.

    You might also think about the Mamiya 6, a rangefinder.

    As for pricing, I think the best place for guidance is the www.keh.com. Their prices might be a bit higher than you can manage with a little patience on e-bay, but they have a generous rating system, and a return policy.

  6. #6
    Andy K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sunny Southend, England.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,422
    Images
    81
    Thank you all for your replies. They have all been very helpful! I find myself leaning towards Hasselblad, as funnily enough, of the three they seem to be the cheaper second hand option, and still appear to have some service support for their film cameras.

    Suzanne, I did have a look at KEH, but this, in their conditions for international sales and shipping:

    If you are a first time international customer or an existing international customer using a new credit card you must be verified prior to your order being shipped. Verification requires you to fax to (404) 892-1251 or email to sales@keh.com a copy of the front and back of the credit card, and your passport or drivers license along with your order number and telephone number.

    put me off. There is no way on Earth I am going to send information like that in an email to anyone!


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  7. #7
    SuzanneR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,742
    Images
    139
    Andy... I appreciate that using KEH as an international customer is far from ideal, but I think they are a good guide or benchmark for pricing.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Datchet, Berkshire UK- about 20 miles west of London
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    342
    I've used Bronica SQA-i cameras and PS lenses for more than ten years, and naturally enough if I hadn't been happy with what they do I'd have changed long since. Hasselblad UK kindly lent me a new 501 for a while, but their generosity didn't extend to donation and I was forced to conclude that there was insufficient difference in the images to make a change worthwhile. I have no experience of the Mamiya but as with others I know they are big and heavy and unless you plan to use the 67 capability I really can't see much of a reason to choose this over the "native" 6x6 cameras.

    I like my Bronicas because they do what I want and nothing more. I have found them more intuitive and less quirky to use than a Hasselblad- though no doubt I'd have got used to that after a bit longer. Picking up on one or two of the points above. The SQA-i is battery dependent though four tiny button cells are no hardship to carry as spares and I've had no issues in cold weather - I've certainly used Bronicas happily down to -10C and maybe beyond. The ex European importer Intro2020 at Maidenhead offer a repair service using the same Japanes factory technician they had when selling new cameras, and there are independent repairers, certainly around London that can fix Bronicas. Obviously I don't know how long the former will go on. But todays low prices mean that this world has changed. Frankly for all but the simplest repairs or under a warranty, its about as cheap to replace rather than repair, keeping the broken one for spares. I can't say that my Bronicas have been 100% reliable, but neither are they forever needing to be fixed and they are robust enough to survive a lot of travel in less than ideal conditions in the care of someone who sees them as a tool rather than something to cherish. Certainly I don't share a view that they seem less robust than Hasselblad. The system contains everything most people need to make whatever images they want- most of it is available online without too long a wait. Personally I choose to use a hand-held spotmeter rather than the metering in my prisms, but thats a "fit with workflow" issue rather than the prisms being inaccurate.

    I'm entirely sure that you'd be just as happy with a Hasselblad - maybe happier if the badge on the front is remotely important. But it will cost you more- either in money or in the age/condition of the equipment you can buy with a fixed budget.

    If you think that looking at images on a computer screen will help, you can see photographs made with Bronicas on the gallery section of http://www.robertwhite.co.uk/ or in the featured photographer section of www.westcoastimaging.com- or indeed on my own site www.photography001.com though this latter is somewhat old now.

  9. #9
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,661
    Images
    122
    I have had my RB67 for a year now and I think it's great. I bought it mainly because the 6x7 format is the same as the maximum my enlarger will go to - possibly not the best reason for buying something.

    Adding a left hand grip made it quite easy to use hand held with the waist level finder. I prefer a waist level finder to a prism finder and the rotating back makes this a possibility. If I wanted a vertical shot with my Bronica ETRS when using the waist level finder it was very difficult to aim properly.

    As others have said, choose any of the three you mentioned and I don't think you will be dissapointed. The build quality of the ETRS is good and if the RB67 didn't come along at the right time, I probably would have bought a Bronica SQ - almost the same as the ETRS but square format which I like.

    Although Suzanne's comment about buying from KEH may not seem like a good idea from the UK, we also have the current $2 - £1 exchange rate in our favour. Although those terms and conditions seem a bit over the top!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #10
    Andy K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sunny Southend, England.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,422
    Images
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by SuzanneR View Post
    Andy... I appreciate that using KEH as an international customer is far from ideal, but I think they are a good guide or benchmark for pricing.
    Yes it was useful to see their price list. I now have a target area for pricing.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin