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  1. #21
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I have the 80 and never really found myself looking for one more. If I could get the 150 as well, for portraits and figure work, I would be set. I don't use wide angle, but that's just more my inability to use it well than not wanting one.
    I decided a long time ago to stop worrying so much about equipment. That was years ago. I still have too much stuff... I'm working my way to simplicity.

    All of the lenses you mention are excellent. The only lens I've ever heard anyone speak poorly of is the 60mm. I think the grief was corner sharpness. Don't hold me to it.
    Pretty comfortable dilemma you're stuck with... I'd get the 80 and the 150 and let the rest work itself out. I have seen some stunning work done with the wide angle lenses, though. The 50mm seems to be really nice and the 40mm above the rest.

    Good luck with your choice, especially now since I made it even more confusing...

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #22
    André E.C.'s Avatar
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    Well, as others, I do have the classic 50/80/150 CF set and I think I don´t need nothing else.
    Maybe one day, I will sell the 80 and get the 100 I think.



    Cheers



    André

  3. #23

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    I too have the 50/80/150. The 150 gets used least of all by a long way. Might all be a mute point as I'll probably have to sell it all to fund my 7x17 desires... :-(

  4. #24

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    Before going to 4 X 5 for landscape I used to take a 50 and 120 with me. Later I swapped the 50 for a 40 and added a 2 X converter

  5. #25
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antje View Post
    What Steve said. I didn't suffer from any GAS (regarding the Blad) after acquiring the 250 - those four are really all I need. Now a SWC, that would be something...

    Antje
    I am in the same place but the price of the SWCs go up faster than I can save the money! :o

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #26
    lns
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    The 80 was my first lens, and my only lens for a long time. I still use it almost exclusively, and I could certainly get by with just that. I wouldn't think you'd need to start with anything else.

    I recently added a 150 for portraits because it was at a bargain price, and now I have more than enough. For wide, I do have an old SWC, which is fantastic, and which actually gets more use than my 501cw. I've used the 60, 120 and 180 lenses, and they are excellent, but I wanted to keep it simple, lighter and cheaper. In any event, you can't go wrong with any lens you choose. Compared to a Leica, they all seem heavy (other than the SWC), and I use them primarily on a tripod.

    I'm in Glencoe by the way, if I can be of any help. Haven't used a Hasselblad for months, it's just been too cold and gray and icy and grim. But I'm sure spring will come eventually. -Laura

  7. #27
    Antje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I am in the same place but the price of the SWCs go up faster than I can save the money! :o

    Steve
    Yeah, they're pretty save from me and will be for a long time, I guess. I tell myself I don't *really* want one. We all know it's not true. But maybe I can hold my GAS at bay by getting some more cheap rangefinders or so.

    Well, sure...

    Antje

  8. #28
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    For years I shot with a Hassy system, and the longest lens I had was a 120. When used for its intended purpose (macro, general purpose landscape) it is a fine lens. It works as a portrait lens in the studio when you have a short studio to work in. If your goal for a longer lens is portraiture, though, I would go for the 150 or the 180 instead. The 120 can be harsh and unforgiving, and in natural light, at large apertures, the 5-bladed aperture creates some really unpleasant-looking out of focus areas.

  9. #29

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    So much gear, so little time and money.

    I think lens selection varies by how you see. I've always favored a "normal" lens. I have a good friend who loves a wider lens.

    On 6x6, I find an 80mm lens feels a bit wide, about like a 35mm lens on 35mm. I have a 50/80/120 kit, and often find myself using the 120 because the 80 is just too wide. If I was to rebuild my kit, I might go 50/100/150. Of course, the 180 is a very nice lens and then there's the 40 or superwide, and how about a 250 for those odd moments when you need a bigger club? AAARGH!

    The best advice I've seen in this thread so far is to get the 80 and use it for a while. Get used to the feel, see how it works for the images you like to make. Save your money for the next purchases. The lenses are darned expensive and each has its own merits. Good luck!

    Peter Gomena

  10. #30

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    Flying Camera's comment on "harshness" with the 120 echoes experiences I've had with mine. It is darned sharp, but there is a certain harshness to it. Its versatility is wonderful, but if I was to start making a lot of studio portraits, I'd get a 150 or 180, which have a much "rounder" feel to them. My problem with the 150 is that it doesn't focus closely enough for a tight portrait unless you use an extension tube. Different designs for different purposes.

    Peter Gomena

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