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  1. #21
    arigram's Avatar
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    I think I've settled on two Metz flashguns:
    - The 44 MZ-2 which is TTL and SCA.
    http://www.metz.de/en/foto-elektroni...2-digital.html
    - The 20 C-2 which is a small, cheap, automatic little thing.
    http://www.metz.de/en/foto-elektroni...tz-20-c-2.html

    Both, can either fit the SCA module or a L bracket, the 44 with a special TTL extension cord.

    Considering I will be using the flashgun for fill-in flash with a bounce,
    should I just get the small one or cough up for the bigger gun?
    aristotelis grammatikakis
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    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
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  2. #22
    arigram's Avatar
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    Ok, here is my first report after actually buying a small flashgun.
    I went to a local photography store and happened upon the Metz Mecablitz 20B5. It seems to be an older model, now discontinued but very possibly still available in stock. I bought for 28 euros, which is not a bad price, but I am sure I could find it cheaper if I looked. But I didn't have to look, I tried it on the camera on the store and didn't have to pay shipping or wait.

    I haven't fired a shot yet, but I am looking to go through at least a roll of HP5+ as a test. Its use will still remain fill flash for street and travel photography and thus I wanted something small and not powerful. Just enough to light up a face a stop or so and give some catchlight.

    It fits on a L bracket and connects via a PC cord.
    If the show of the bracket is metallic like mine, you need to tape the hot shoe plug of the unit. As you can see, it fits slightly above the lens where normally you would want a flashgun a bit higher. I could get a taller or expanding L bracket but unless the light is really ugly, that would be too much. Also, the bracket I have, falls back a bit and tilts the flashgun at 45 degrees and I am meaning to tape a white plastic sheet and try it with a slight bounce. I might even be able to get a 90 degree tilting head,
    but that might be too much for such a weak unit. Its small though, fits the bag, goes very well with the Rolleiflex and its convenient to hold and operate the focus knob.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC_0188.JPG   DSC_0194.JPG   DSC_0195.JPG  
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  3. #23
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    I think the placement of the flash near the lens will give you an interesting journalistic look. I don't know of any street photographers actually using fill flash on a regular basis, so that will be somewhat unique. Diane Arbus did some close flash stuff that I like.

  4. #24
    arigram's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    I think the placement of the flash near the lens will give you an interesting journalistic look. I don't know of any street photographers actually using fill flash on a regular basis, so that will be somewhat unique. Diane Arbus did some close flash stuff that I like.
    Yeah, Arbus used the Rolleiflash with its bare bulb and reflector, probably at full strength to give that look. I am going for a softer effect and I am thinking that on photographs like this one

    I want to retain the dark look but maybe give a stop more to the subject and also get the catchlight to bring out the eyes. But I like that photograph, dark as it is as it gives the feeling of the place, with the fish sellers usually in the dark and with all the light falling on their displays.
    The Metz 20B5 is small enough to fit in the bag along with the bracket so its not a problem to carry, as a more normal flashgun would be. Its a tight fit with all the accessories really.
    I found Hama selling two interesting shoes: a hotshoe to PC and a 180 degree tilting shoe. The latter, more useful will enable me to try the Metz unit tilted 90 degrees upwards with a bounce.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  5. #25
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Your photograph has interesting dynamics but it definitely comes off as underexposed to me and what is that v notch on the left side in the black border by his shoulder. That'll never work. Spoils the composition. I have used my Rollei in weddings with a Vivitar thyristor flash and just set the film speed on the flash a stop or two too fast and then figure the exposure on the camera as if not using a flash.

  6. #26
    arigram's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    Your photograph has interesting dynamics but it definitely comes off as underexposed to me and what is that v notch on the left side in the black border by his shoulder. That'll never work. Spoils the composition. I have used my Rollei in weddings with a Vivitar thyristor flash and just set the film speed on the flash a stop or two too fast and then figure the exposure on the camera as if not using a flash.
    Well, that picture was made by my Hasselblad, about the time I realized I needed a Rolleiflex and a flash for it...
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
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    no digital additives and shit




  7. #27
    arigram's Avatar
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    ... a camera ready for anything...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails RolleiflexMetz.jpg  
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  8. #28

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    Too bad it won't mount on the other side, you tend to do less winding than you do focusing. BTW, I just bought a couple of original flash units that I'm going to try and convert to electronic. Vintage look, modern operation. One has a big dent in it, so that will be the prototype, the oether is supposed to be in great shape.

  9. #29
    arigram's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg_E View Post
    Too bad it won't mount on the other side, you tend to do less winding than you do focusing.
    The handle is close enough to be able to hold it and focus almost as normal, so its pretty convenient as it is. You can also mount the flash on the other side and you can actually do the half turn on the winder that is needed to wind the film and cock the shutter. The only thing is that you have to wind the new film and place the handle on the ready position before you secure the bracket in place.
    To tell your the truth, its far easier to have the handle on the left side, which does not interfere with your focusing at all, hold the camera by your left hand, while you wind and release the shutter by your right. Aperture and shutter can be adjusted as normal. That is of course if you are right handed. I am sure left handed people can reverse this with ease.
    Last edited by arigram; 07-02-2008 at 11:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  10. #30

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    OK, yes I guess the better hold of the handle would be good for winding the film, especially at the beginning and end of the rolls.

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