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  1. #1
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    Hasselblad-Proxars, or Extension tubes?

    I want to increase the close focus potential from my hasselblad kit and wondered what preference people had for either Proxar filters, or extension tubes? MY main reason for extra close focus potential is for head and shoulder portraits with my 80mm or 150mm, as well as the odd still life. I am leaning towards extension tubes as I believe proxars introduce more glass and suffer from degradation at the edges.

    Anyone have experience with both?
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  2. #2

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    I love adding an 8 mm extension tube to my 100 mm and 150 mm Hasselblad lenses to get even closer to the subject.

    Never seen any ill affect to the image quality. I have an 8 & a 16 mm set of extension tubes. On the 150 mm they work very well. Cheaper than getting a 120 mm micro if you already own the 150 mm.

    I'd avoid close-up lenses. Good luck.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  3. #3
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Use Proxars with no fear.

  4. #4
    arigram's Avatar
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    Tubes.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  5. #5
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Andrew:

    I have never used proxars, but I have and use a full set of extension tubes for macro-type shots. In fact, I just finished processing the film from some close ups of tulips that I shot with my 150 and a 32 mm tube. If I got anything good it will be posted soon.

    I do have one question borne of the fact that portraiture is not my strong suit: what is the logic of tubes with a 150 for portraits? Do you keep the good perspective of the 150 focal length but get a tighter composition with the tube (or proxar)?

    Dan


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  6. #6
    resummerfield's Avatar
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    I use tubes, either an 8 or 16, to get tight head shots with my 150mm.
    —Eric

  7. #7
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    Firephoto, the 150 does not have the best close focus and if you want tight head and shoulders portraits, a tube or proxar is the only answer.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  8. #8
    loman's Avatar
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    I love using proxars. They are amazing.

  9. #9
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I have, and use, all three Proxars. I've never noticed any degradation. When done with proper designing, an additional element (the more, the better, right?) in an optical system can be very effective.

    Remember, that the use of supplementary lenses only changes the effective focal length of the lens. With Proxars, or most simple "close-up" lenses, aperture-to-film distances are constant - there will be no changes to f/stop values. With tubes or bellows the aperture is located further from the film, and f/stops require re-calculation.
    Last edited by Ed Sukach; 05-10-2008 at 06:10 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Sundry fixing.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  10. #10

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    Well... no.

    The use of supplementary lenses changes more than just the focal length.
    It also changes the correction of the lens.

    Proxars are very simple, single element lenses. Not even achromats. So much for "proper designing".

    It's hard, impossible even, to design them properly anyway.
    First, because unless you want to have matched proxars, i.e. different ones, each dedicated to be used with only one lens, having others for use on another lens, yet others for use on the same lenses, but in combination with a second proxar, etc., they must be of a simple 'general purpose' design that can never be "proper".
    Second, because the lenses they are used on already are properly designed bits of optics, that do not respond well to having another lens stuck in front of them.

    Proxars are easy to use. But bad for image quality (and they really are, despite some people not noticing they are).
    So tubes are used for image quality, Proxars for being lazy.

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