Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,913   Posts: 1,556,260   Online: 868
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,408
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    433
    I've got a #3 Brownie that I'm using for wet-plate. The #3 has two shutter speeds - T and 1/xxxth, and three apertures - f11,f16,f22. It makes for some slow exposures, since wet plate has an ASA of about 1, give or take, kinda sorta. The #3 used an extinct rollfilm format that yielded approximately 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 inch negatives, which is coincidentally 1/4 plate size.

  2. #12
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,252
    Images
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by dmr View Post
    IIRC, Verichrome Pan, ca. mid 1960s, was ASA 125.
    Hmmm -- you prompted me to dig a little -- yes according to my 1965 Kodak Master Darkroom Dataguide(!) Verichrome Pan was indeed 125.

    A Google search got me to a Kodak history page which says Verichrome Pan was introduced in 1956. That leads me to the sobering conclusion that I probably started out shooting plain ol' Verichrome without the "Pan." I'm pretty sure I got that camera as a gift circa 1950. Oy -- I can feel my joints creaking!

    Thus far I haven't found a speed mentioned for plain Verichrome -- mayhaps that's where I got the 64/80 notion. Anyway, those 1940s and 50s box cameras should play reasonably well with 100 +/- negative films.

    (Oh - and I believe Kodachrome was ASA 10 when I first shot it. :rolleyes

    DaveT

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    Hello,

    I have shot a lot with my Brownie No. 2. This model takes 120 (makes eight 6x9 pix in this case), so is one of the best to get these days, since you can get the film in any photo store, unlike 620, 127, etc.

    The camera has three apertures (and one shutter speed, plus a T feature), which is a lot better than some Brownies. The pix are actually "decent" until you get out to the edges, where they get dark and soft. The smaller the aperture, the farther from the center of the frame is sharp, and the less vignetting you get.

    I have blown them up to 8x12, but I was after a kind of soft look. At 5x7 they look "sharp"...Brownie sharp, anyhow.

    They are "best" in bright sun, like most crummy cameras. But you might not want "best", depending on what you are after. I have used all sorts of films. I like Pan F the best. It seems to line up well with whatever was intended to go into the camera when it was new, meaning that the aperture settings are actually pretty accurate (sun, cloudy sun, shade, etc.). Pan F is usually a 25 film anyhow for me, so the camera must have been made with a 25 film in mind, or something thereabouts.

    You just have to shoot some and see what happens, then make adjustments the next time. Nothing is very accurate on them. That's why they are so fun, though.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 05-20-2008 at 11:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    State College, PA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kennedy View Post
    The hawkeye is a lot of fun.One version takes standard 120 rolls.
    100 ASA B&W film,sunny day,ya can't go wrong.

    Mike
    Mine will take the 120 roll as long as I use the 620 for the take up.

  5. #15
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    The Hawkeye is pretty neat with a flash attachment. I use it in daylight with 100 or 400 film, depending on what I have. At night, you have an open shutter setting that's pretty cool for making multiple exposures &c since the camera is essentially a TLR.

    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  6. #16
    Wishy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    189
    I've just picked up a number 2 beau brownie (120) for not a lot of cash. Will be putting some film through it shortly

  7. #17
    dmr
    dmr is offline
    dmr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    493
    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    A Google search got me to a Kodak history page which says Verichrome Pan was introduced in 1956. That leads me to the sobering conclusion that I probably started out shooting plain ol' Verichrome without the "Pan." I'm pretty sure I got that camera as a gift circa 1950. Oy -- I can feel my joints creaking!
    My dad used to say that Verichrome ortho and Super-XX were the two best films ever made and Big Yellow discontinued them about the same time, which was about when they came out with Verichrome Pan. He would kind of badmouth VP from time to time, citing it as a poor replacement for the original Verichrome and Super-XX.

    When I got my own first camera (a Brownie Starflash, about 8yo) Verichrome Pan was the only Kodak B&W film you could get for it. I would sometimes use Ansco All-Weather Pan, and quite honestly I don't think anybody could tell the difference between them.

    Yeah, I'm gettin' old too!

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    284
    I frequently use a Kodak #2 Box Camera from 1930. I measured the aperture and shutter speed. The camera is designed for shooting ASA 25 film in full sun. With Fuji 800 speed film, I can shoot nicely around evening/dusk. I also use Efke 100 in sunlight and hold a #25 filter in front of the lens. I like the look of the single element lens but prefer glass to plastic. That's the same reason I prefer my Woca Holga to a regular Holga.

  9. #19
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,458
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by honeydo View Post
    I've got the Brownie Hawkeye....no adjustments can be made on it. It was great....it came with a roll of film in it my grandfather exposed most of 40 years ago. I developed it and got wonderful pics of my sisters and uncle at Kennywood in Pittsburgh.
    I, too, own a brand-spanking new (or so it looks!) Brownie Hawkeye. The original pre-flash version. Came with the original yellow Kodak box and a receipt for $5.50. But I beg to differ. Adjustments can be made to it. After a complete disassembly and cleaning, I made the following:

    * Measured the true f/stop value for the little fixed meniscus lens and the true shutter speed using a Calumet Shutter Tester. Came to almost exactly f/11 and about 1/40th of a second. A bit slow for anything moving (sometimes including me, unfortunately).

    * Using a tiny piece of appropriately curved black photographic tape, I masked off just enough of the rotary shutter blade opening to give me a measured 1/250th second at f/11. Much nicer.

    * Cut a small square from an extra Kodak Wratten #8 (yellow) gelatin filter and during reassembly placed it immediately behind the small internal square of glass that covers the lens. Normally there's about a 1-stop correction required for this filter.

    Since my tested and standardized EI for 120 HP5+ is 250, the overall net effect of these adjustments is that the camera is now a perfect-exposure machine for Sunny-16 days. And the now high-speed shutter means subjects are no longer motion-blurred. And the little monochrome filter works wonders to sharpen up the B&W images, as well as give me nicely rendered blue skies.

    And, yes, believe it or not, I have been asked - more than once - what kind of digital camera it is...

    Ken
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 05-22-2008 at 12:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
    glbeas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Roswell, Ga. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,307
    Images
    109
    I have a shot of my mother taken with a box Brownie she had as a youngster.
    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...911&ppuser=220
    Gary Beasley

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin