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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by JPD View Post
    ...or Nettar Anastigmat.

    It shouldn't be difficult to find a pre-war Nettar or Ikonta with Tessar for $60 or less.
    The Nettar Anastigmat was likely made by Hensoldt which Zeiss owned.
    I have two Super Ikonta 111s with Novars and I cannot find them inferior to the Tessars-to my surprise
    Mark
    Mark Layne
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    and Barbados

  2. #12
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Well, I picked up the camera. It's nice, but the shutter speeds are off. T, B, 1/1, 1/2 and 1/25 work but all the others sound/look all the same. Would it be easy to get in there and fix it?

  3. #13
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    I have a 6x6 Nettar with the Novar f6.8 lens. It is a great camera, pocketable and capable of producing prints that put ordinary 35mm shots to shame. It also has a 'cute' non-threatening look to it so people don't pay much attention to it -- unless they are fellow photographers.

    5x7 prints of shots made wide-open are perfectly acceptable, I wouldn't go looking at the prints with a 20x loupe though. At f11-16 it is good enough for most any purposes, but don't expect to compete with a Hassy. Lens to lens variation may be significant, but this is just a WAG. They also made the camera with an f4.5 Novar, I don't know how well this performs wide open. A good triplet is capable of excellent performance, the problem is that a good 4-element Tessar is cheaper to make than a good triplet because triplet tolerances are very tight for optimum performance. Most triplets are made for low cost - so getting a good one can have an element of luck to it.

    I would try to get one with an up-market shutter. I find the base Vario with 25/75/200 speeds is a bit limiting.

    As already mentioned, it is a good idea to check focus alignment, as it is on any folding camera (and on _any_ used [even new] camera). Scotch magic tape stretched across the film gate makes a good focusing surface. Pick an infinity target. At wide open check the image center's sharpest point is with the lens focused at infinity, and that the corners are equally fuzzy. You can also use a closer object and use a tape measure to set the distance from the subject to the film plane. To check focus I place several screws head down on a table, in a line at a 45 degree angle to the camera, spaced an inch apart. I set the distance for the middle screw and take the picture wide open at the closest focusing distance. I then check the resulting photos and make sure middle screw is in focus and that the sharp focus range is roughly the same forward and back.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
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  4. #14

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    I have a 515 with a Novar lens which tended to be a bit soft
    until I adjusted the film pressure plate.
    Great little camera.

  5. #15
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IloveTLRs View Post
    Well, I picked up the camera. It's nice, but the shutter speeds are off. T, B, 1/1, 1/2 and 1/25 work but all the others sound/look all the same. Would it be easy to get in there and fix it?
    It is not that hard to pull the shutter & lens. There are several articles on the web on DIY shutter repair. The less you take things apart the better, so start with removing the cover plates and give a good flush with Ronsonol - if that gets things going I would leave it at that.

    "Don't fix it if it isn't broken."
    "If you fix anything for long enough you will break it."
    - Murphy
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
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  6. #16
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    What causes shutter speeds to be off? Will a few drops of lighter fluid help? There is no gumming up anywhere.

    I found this guide: http://www.daniel.mitchell.name/came...aa023797a63acf but it's very intimidating.

  7. #17
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Springs weaken and loose their tension.

    Ian

  8. #18
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    That's what I thought.

    Urgh, that means taking the thing to pieces.

  9. #19

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    In a shutter, springs rarely weaken. Perhaps they rust, get stretched or pushed beyond their range because of a heavy-handed user, but the springs themselves rarely weaken. Or so I was told by an expert in metals some time ago.

    Be judicious in your use of lighter fluid. If it gets on the lens, make sure that you clean the lens before reassembling the camera. You should do that anyway -- clean all of the lenses.

    Your camera has a very simple shutter -- maybe a Telma or a Klio. These generally are very easy to disassemble. Get some compressed air and first gently blow out any dust or debris that's in there before using lighter fluid.

    The best method is a mix of lighter fluid and powdered graphite. When the lighter fluid evaporates, there is some graphite left behind, which is a dry lubricant. Make sure that you blow out the assembly so it removes any excess graphite.

    The Novar, a triplet, is a decent performer. It was made by one of several third-party lens makers and rarely carries a serial number. The Nettar Anastigmat also is a triplet, but I haven't had enough experience with that lens to comment on its performance.

    A well-designed triplet can be a very credible lens. The Kodak Anastigmat on the Duo 620 is an excellent lens, as is the Zeiss Triotar and certain Agfa Apotars.

  10. #20
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Well, using the above instructions I took off the lens, the shutter speed dial and cover. I mostly played with it and didn't disassemble it any further (for fear of not getting it back together again.)

    1/175 sounds okay, as does 1/100. 1/50 is off unless I position the speed dial slightly between it and 1/25. 1/25 is okay, as is 1/2, 1/1, B and T. 1/10 & 1/5 are way too fast; they feel like 1/100. I've put a test roll in and will see how it comes out.

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