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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Favourite 6x6 system

    Hi all,

    I am interested to know what 6x6 system you have chosen and why? I was considering a Mamiya 6 however I'm not sure I will be fully comfortable with a RF and other restrictions to the system. I find a Blad a little bulky to move with but perhaps I could adjust to this. I shoot mostly landscape, some people photography and street work. 6x7 is also an option but I love 6x6. I have considered 6x4.5 but I think the bigger neg. are better options. Over to you!

    Many thanks for any contributions

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Westminster, Maryland, USA
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    I love my Mamiya 7 system. I've seen wonderful work made on the Mamiya 6. All rangefinder systems take getting use to. All systems have restrictions. We must live within limits.

    Before you buy, see if you can try out a number of systems to see what feels correct to you eye, and works well in you hands.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  3. #3
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Jul 2005
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    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
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    At one time, for a long time, I used a wheelbarrow full of Hassie stuff.
    Things change, today I don't do a high volume of 120, and the Koni Omega is a stunning solution for what I need.

    And yet, if I ever got rid of the 35, the 4x5 and the 8x10... and the Koni, I would be perfectly happy with a late model TLR Rolleiflex, the most perfect camera ever made.

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Pittsburgh PA
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    Stating the obvious, unless you are going to make only square prints the 6 X 6 format has to be cropped. That leads one to a 645 or 6 X 7. Be sure and handle your choice before you commit. A Mamiya 645 Pro with a power winder and prism finder is very much like a 35mm SLR. There is an incredible array of lenses and accessories for the 645 Pro. A 645 Pro can do everything you ask and with careful exposure, developing and printing can easily make 11 X 14 fine art prints just like a 6 X 6 negative. A RB67 is best on a tripod. Either is much less expensive than a ‘Blad and both are as capable. You could have both for the price of a “Blad.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Somerset, England
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    I love using my Mamiya c330 TLR a nice well built (that means heavy) camera which you can pick up at a reasonable price these days and the lenses are great.
    Although I occasionally crop to 645 format I really like the square 6x6 format a lot and find myself using that more and more.

  6. #6
    arigram's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    Crete, Greece
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    I love my complete Hasselblad system for its flexibility and my Rolleiflex for traveling and street.
    For me, both systems complete each other and fill the gaps that enable me as a photographer to
    work in any way possible.
    The Hasselblad is flexible and perfect for demanding projects of any kind as I can choose any lens,
    back or accessory that fits the job at hand, but the Rolleiflex with its compact size and quiet shutter
    takes over as my traveling and walking camera of choice.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Phoeinx Arizona
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    [QUOTE=jblake;638760]Hi all,

    I was considering a Mamiya 6 however I'm not sure I will be fully comfortable with a RF and other restrictions to the system.

    For street work a rangfinder is very quick and Mamiya 6 is a great camera. But for Street Work I like my TLR, Yashica 125 and Ds, light weight and portable, but I also use my Mamiya 6, not the new model the folder.

    I shoot mostly landscape,

    I use a Mamiya Universal with a 3 lens kit with a 6X9 back, but Mamiya also made a 6X7 back and a muilt back with 6X6 and 6.45, the leaf shutters and the fact that a Rangfinder does not have a mirror makes for very sharp negatives. But at time I also use a Kowa 66 when I need longer lens such as a 250mm.

    For portraits I use a Kowa 66 with a 150mm lens, or a TLR with the 80mm.

  8. #8
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    Jun 2004
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    Best/The Netherlands
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    I changed from my pentax 645 / 67 to hasselblad (500cm) last year.
    I also do a lot of landscape work and fine art.

    Why?
    When i compaired the results shot with the zeiss lenses my mouth fell on the floor. The increase in quality is high, which i never would have believed if not tested myself.

    So i think any system that has zeiss lenses will do.

  9. #9
    Barry S's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    DC Metro
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    The Hasselblad V system is pure joy to use and I agree that the Zeiss lenses have a beautiful image quality that goes way beyond a simple description of resolution or MTF. The expense of Hasselblad equipment isn't arbitrary--it reflects the quality of the camera and the optics. You can't find a more extensive system of bodies, backs, accessories and optics.

  10. #10
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Jun 2006
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    Portland OR USA
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    Regarding rangefinders I think that if you are the type of photographer who likes to linger over and think about his compositions you are probably better with a TLR or SLR. Occassionally I borrow my friends Mamiya 6 or 7 and the range finder always kills me. I am a contemplative photographer and I find the range finder hard to relate to for various reasons.

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