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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Sanders, the OP says half of each negative looks OK, not half the film

    When I first looked at the photo of the camera, I was sat in bright light - now looking again it's extremely obvious that the lens has very severe problems. It definitely appears to have fungus &/or separation affecting the elements.

    You would be looking at a very costly repair. There are companies who will disassemble clean repolish, recoat lenses but they tend to be very expensive. Arax no longer offers his service, but Balham Optical in London have an extremely high reputation. They rebuild & recoat optics for major film studios etc. Send them the photo & ask for a basic price.

    Ian

  2. #12
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    Ian, I could be wrong, but I read the post as saying
    half of the negatives were okay: "Half of the pics are
    what I expected - a little on the gray side and grainy
    but otherwise okay. The other half of the pictures are
    a different story. The bottom half of these pics look as
    expected, but the top half varies from very light to
    completely white out."

    Either way, the entire contact sheet will tell a better story.

    I agree with you that the lens looks scary. But I can't
    see how that could be the cause of the weird exposures
    shown in the scans.

    Best,

    Sanders

  3. #13

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    Yes, Sanders is correct. Five of the shots came out fine (well, fine for someone who hasn't used a manual focus camera in over 15 years, and guessing at the exposure values. In other words, gray, grainy, and ever so slightly out of focus as I didn't have my glasses on). My main purpose in this roll was simply to test the camera, make sure it functioned properly and to see if any of the grit on the lens showed up on film.

    Sorry for the DIY contact sheet. It was the best that I could do. I also apparently missed two of the negatives (lack of sleep), but included a close up of one of the ones that I thought was fine (the single one).

    Locally I have noone who will even look at it. If you guys feel that the lens is going to be a problem and repair is costly then I will probably sell it as a collectible and put the money toward saving for a better one. Anyway, here's the negatives:












  4. #14

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    Have you tried cleaning the lens with some solution and lens tissue first? I've sometimes found that nasty looking lenses clean up well after that. Just make sure there is no grit on the lens first.

  5. #15

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    When I received the camera I cleaned the lens with Zeiss lens cleaning solution lightly put on a new microfiber cloth. I haven't tried to clean the lens from the inside because I was afraid of accidentally getting the shutter wet and the inside appeared very clean and dust free.

  6. #16

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    You have some degradation of the lens coating. It's uncommon, but it happens. I've seen it in another 2.8C. As to what's causing the flare in the photos, that's a bit hard to say without a physical inspection of the camera.

    It almost looks as if there might be something in the shutter that is occluding the light path. As others have pointed out, because the fogging doesn't go beyond the image (and not into the outer area where the frame numbers are located), I would suspect that it's something in the shutter assembly.

    However, I first would inspect the interior of the camera and see if there are any cobwebs (seriously) or any loose debris. Then open the back -- remove it if you want -- put the shutter on B, lock open the shutter with the lens at f/2.8 and shake the camera a bit and see if any debris lands on the lens. Use a flashlight or an open window or any light source that isn't the sun. Close the shutter and repeat several times.

  7. #17
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    Alyson, I had hoped to see the negatives in the order
    they were shot -- I can't tell from the scans if they
    appear in order, but the content of the negatives
    suggests not. But now that I am seeing all 12, I am
    beginning to think the lens is at fault. One way of
    telling would be to shoot a test roll. The first six
    frames, shoot into a space with no direct light source
    -- a vale of trees, for example, with the sun behind
    you. Shoot the rest of the roll toward the sun. I am
    betting you will see no flare in the first six, and heavy
    flare in the last.

    I don't think it is a processing mistake -- the film
    rebates appear unaffected. Whatever is happening,
    is happening in the initial exposure. Your taking lens
    issues may be sufficiently extreme to cause the flaring
    you are seeing when a bright light is in the frame.

    The 2.8C is a great camera. If it is otherwise in good
    shape you might be able to get past the lens issues.
    If the lens cannot be fixed economically, it might be
    possible to replace it from another dead Rolleiflex.
    Check in with Paul Ebel up in Wisconsin -- he's one
    of the best Rollei repair guys out there (I use him),
    he might have some ideas for you that won't break
    the bank. You can reach Paul at

    paulebel44@yahoo.com

    Good luck.

    Sanders
    Last edited by Rolleiflexible; 06-12-2008 at 11:11 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Alyson;

    There is no fog on the "rails" at the edge except in one frame. There is no fog between frames either. This looks to me like the result of 3 things. A bad lens combined with a bad shutter, which gives "hot spots" in the image areas, and loosely wound film which can give intermittant linear fogged areas across the width of the film. I think the latter is the cause of the edge fog in the one visible frame.

    So, multiple problems.

    PE

  9. #19

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    A Compur shutter opens from the center, so any fogging would occur in the center, unless one of the blades has come off its path. And that can be seen immediately by setting the shutter on B, looking through the back and repeatedly tensioning and releasing the shutter.

    The occlusion occurs at the top of the photo, so the problem (whatever it is) will be in the bottom of the lens or shutter assembly.

    A degradation of the lens coating could induce more flare, but I wouldn't expect it to occur to that degree unless there was a bright light source behind the subjects. However, again, I think a physical inspection of the camera and perhaps one more roll through the camera would be a better test.

  10. #20

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    However, I first would inspect the interior of the camera and see if there are any cobwebs (seriously) or any loose debris. Then open the back -- remove it if you want -- put the shutter on B, lock open the shutter with the lens at f/2.8 and shake the camera a bit and see if any debris lands on the lens. Use a flashlight or an open window or any light source that isn't the sun. Close the shutter and repeat several times.
    I tried this and don't see any debris whatsoever. The inside looks incredibly clean and dust free. I tried the shutter at all settings and with all apertures and everything seemed fine and closed tightly as it should. I also inspected the lens better while open in the B setting and noticed that the grime on it looks almost like a fine glaze. When I rubbed it a bit harder with a fine cloth it smeared a little like it was greasy. I'm going to try to get hold of the photography department at a local college and see if they can better examine/clean it. I'm so broke right now that I really couldn't afford to ship it out for any repairs. I'll keep it in mind, though, in case I get caught up.

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