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  1. #1

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    medium format for the field

    I shoot primarily 4x5, black and white with some color transparencies as well. My subject is nature/landscape photography but since I live in New England old barns and churches are sometimes subjects as well. I have a nice Minolta Autocord but I'm thinking about a medium format camera that will allow me to change focal lengths. I've tried the Mamiya C220 and just didn't like it at all.

    I'm thinking about a Pentax 67 or Hasselblad 500 C/M. Gustavo's RZ set-up it extremely attractive but it wouldn't be too much lighter than my 4x5 with a 90-150-210mm lens kit and I would loose perspective control and tilt. The Pentax is less expensive but I couldn't change films like with the Hassie.

    Any thoughts?

    Scott

  2. #2
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Would a Bronica be out of the question? I have an S and really like it. It's heavier than a TLR but the viewfinder is wonderful, and much more usable in low light.

    I bought mine because Hassies are too expensive.

  3. #3

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    I use an RB-67 when I can't take my 4x5. I have three lenses for it and love it, but it weighs a ton. If I had the money, I would buy a Mamiya 7 right now. No interchangeable backs, but you could always get two bodies if you were really flush. They are extremely light, lighter than most DSLR's, I think.

  4. #4
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    http://www.sl66.com/

    beats them all...

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by IloveTLRs View Post
    Would a Bronica be out of the question? I have an S and really like it. It's heavier than a TLR but the viewfinder is wonderful, and much more usable in low light.

    I bought mine because Hassies are too expensive.
    I had forgotten about Bronicas. They are less expensive than the Hassies so lets throw them into the mix as well

    Scott

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by gandolfi View Post
    http://www.sl66.com/

    beats them all...
    They are ideal but out of my price range.

    Scott

  7. #7
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    I have and use a P67, and a C220. The two biggest advantages of the Pentax are the ability to use dof preview, and the ability to use filters that require being able to see what they're doing, i.e polarizers and GND filters. But, the Pentax is a much heavier kit than the 220, and when you use a prism finder on the TLR, it's a much more satisfying experience. And then too, the 6x7 negative can be cropped to 6x6 square, while cropping the 6x6 to a rectangle results in a yet smaller negative.

    All that said, I'd like to get a Hassie because I'm very partial to square, and being an SLR, the advantages of the Pentax are similar. There's also no need to turn the camera on its side like the P67, and that means, for me at least, a light ball head on a CF 'pod is sufficient support.

    In any case, good luck making a decision.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  8. #8

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    For light weight, walking around medium format, I prefer the Mamiya 7 rangefinder system. True it can't do close-ups, but can shoot 120, 220, and 35 mm panoramic formats. Good choice of lens focal lengths, and its weight can't be beat. I traveled most of Tuscany with this system and never missed much.

    I do own a Hasselblad system, too, and would never think of schlepping it around like I do the Mamiya 7 system. I'd rather carry a Crown Graphic 4x5 than the Hassy system.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott k View Post
    I shoot primarily 4x5, black and white with some color transparencies as well. My subject is nature/landscape photography but since I live in New England old barns and churches are sometimes subjects as well. I have a nice Minolta Autocord but I'm thinking about a medium format camera that will allow me to change focal lengths.

    Scott
    I highly recommend the Mamiya 7. If you use this camera on a tripod quality is almost on a par with 4X5, and there is a fairly wide range of lenses, 43mm, 50mm, 65mm, 80mm and 150mm. I actually prefer a rangefinder camera to SLR for the type of work you describe.

    Sandy King

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinholemaster View Post
    I'd rather carry a Crown Graphic 4x5 than the Hassy system.
    Wow! that says a lot. Are you exaggerating or are you serious? The only advantage of the Mamiya RB/RZ would be the macro capabilities. I also like macro a lot but I realize that not one camera system will fit all needs. Is the Mamiya 7 really THAT good? I would like to check one out but I'm kind of isolated here and have never seen one in person. It seems like a lot of cash for 6x7 but if it is as good as 4x5 it might be worth it. If I sold off my 4x5 gear I could get the Mamiya 7 and lighten my load quite a bit but it seems like a hell of a gamble.

    Scott

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