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  1. #11

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    Make sure to get the more than 90% isopropyl

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg_E View Post
    Make sure to get the more than 90% isopropyl
    Maybe even need to do better than that... 2-Propanol (reagent grade iso-propyl alcohol) has water in it. Only .02%, but it is still water.

    Watch cleaning fluid is generally hydrocarbon based, like naptha... and it has worked for years in mechanisms that are much more delicate than a shutter. The comment that lighter fluid leaves residue is certainly debatable.

    What is generally the problem with any kind of shutter cleaning without tearing to down completely is the re-distribution of old and dirty lubricants. If a shutter is really thoroughly cleaned (alcohol or naptha) and dried it won't rust and might run well. If lubricated according to spec it will more likely run well for a longer time.

    Raynerj's site is interesting, but few would consider that a gen-u-wine CLA.

  3. #13
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    What is generally the problem with any kind of shutter cleaning without tearing to down completely is the re-distribution of old and dirty lubricants.
    That's why I give my more important shutters two or three baths in naptha. The first bath usually turn yellowish and dirty. The second and third baths are perfectly clear.

  4. #14

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    That is the standard procedure for watch and clock cleaning... except it is the piece parts that are cleaned in several baths, not the entire assembly, to ensure that all dirt, corrosion and old lubricant is removed and the parts can be completely dried prior to reassembly/lubrication.

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