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  1. #11
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Hey, somebody actually wants my opinion! Well I have used both quite a lot. As a commercial photog I used Hasselblad but for personal work a Rollei. Your affection for a system is completely subjective. To me the Hasselblad was a necessary tool that I never got attached to while the Rollei is a camera I can't let go of.

    The TLR is like an SLR because you view through a matched viewing lens but it is like a Range finder because there is no mirror and the shutter is very light and quiet. So it is the best of both.

    Regarding camera repairs in Australia, once you get a thorough CLA/overhaul for a Rollei it is probably good for as long as you will continue to use it. In my experience Hasselblads need regular service.

    I am comfortable with the 80mm lens for most everything including portraits and architecture. But I do keep a Pentax 67 with 55mm lens and a 165 lens in the closet just in case.

    2000 should get you a really nice Rollei and might even pay for a CLA. And you won't be losing your money if you change your mind and re sell it. I have made money everytime I sold a Rollei. I thought last year when I bought a new FX that I would lose money on that like buying a new car but now the prices have gone up so much I think I can even get that back if I need to.

    I know people who love their Hasselblads just as much as I love my Rolleis and the quality is superb with both. As long as the condition of the camera is good.
    Dennis

  2. #12
    Barry S's Avatar
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    I've used both the Rollei and Hasselblads quite a bit and they're very different beasts. Once you buy a Rollei--that's it, nothing much more to buy--and that may be a good thing. . The Hasselblad is a system camera and the system is huge. I much preferred almost everything about the Hasselblad--mainly because I like the flexibility of different focal lengths and the easy ability to shoot macro with extension tubes. The 80mm on my Hasselblad was also noticeably better than the lens on my Rolleiflex. Also, the Rollei seemed to draw a lot of attention--people love to stop and chat and talk about the camera. For some reason, the Hasselblad doesn't attract so much attention, although the mirror makes a loud thwap!, so once you take one shot, your cover is blown. Neither camera is a chick magnet.

  3. #13

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    I used my Rollei 2.8C for 25 years before buying a gently used Hasselblad system from a friend.

    I found the Rollei's limitations to be few. First, if you weren't in the right place, you had the wrong lens. Second, accessories were difficult to find.

    You can't change #1, but auction sites make finding the accessories easier. (You can find some accessories new, but you'll pay through the nose for them. Just try to assemble a nice black-and-white filter kit . . .) My Rollei has the 2.8 Xenotar. Sweet lens, no complaints. Shutter amazingly accurate. Rugged, dependable, simple.

    The Hasselblad has it beat hands-down for versatility and is part of a well-thought-out system. Accessories are easy to find but not cheap. You can build a nice system over time with a little shopping. It takes more thought to use, but once you're in the groove it's fast and easy. I love it, and it is now my primary camera. Does it make technically better pictures than the Rollei?
    Maybe. There's a 40-year difference in lens manufacturing and coating between the two of them. I see differences in contrast and sharpness characteristics. Different flavors, one not superior or inferior to the other.

    I probably will never sell my Rollei. I hope my kids will learn to use it. On any extended outing, I carry it as a backup to the Hasselblad.

    I can't hand-hold either one very well, so I've used both cameras primarily on a tripod.

    Peter Gomena

  4. #14
    Sparky's Avatar
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    In response to the original question... I really doubt the film will know the difference. So the question OUGHT to come down to the most important question: "which camera can you make better photographs with...?"

    I think that's a very important question and one that gets REALLY overlooked in most of these discussions - simply because it involves a process which will not permit you to compare numbers. Comfort should be a HUGE issue with the camera you choose, for example... I've had cameras I simply didn't 'click' with (yeah yeah - there's a joke in there somewhere!).

  5. #15
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    I agree with needing to like the camera in order to enjoy using it.. lifes too short. And even going through Rolleis in search of the Holy Grail (the special slightly sharper one) I found for inexplicable reasons a couple that had bad karma or didn't set right with me or something. And a couple that seemed extra good. Or whatever.

    But regarding sharpness in comparsion with the Hasselblad you have to compare 80mm to 80mm and if you did a side by side sharpness test the Hasselblad won't test sharper than the Rollei. The lenses are practically dead on sharp. How much sharper can sharp be than sharp? Sharpness shouldn't be the issue. The Hasselblad Planar is multi coated (I don't know that about the older Hasselblads) and the Pre GX Rollei Planar and Xenotar is single coated. So there should be less flare with the Hasselblad but probably not often noticeable and in black and white the little bit of flare might be a good thing.

  6. #16
    Sparky's Avatar
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    I'd like to suggest comparing the two for sharpness is an incredibly moot point bordering on the inane. Time and time again it's been shown that the differences in individual samples are far greater than the differences between the lenses AS A SPECIES. So - just try and get a good one. A camera with inferior optics that gets USED is FAR more valuable than something that measures better and sits on a shelf!

  7. #17

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    Yeah, I agree sharpness is not an issue, and it shouldn't be. A good lens is a good lens. As I said in a previous post, the "flavors" are different. If you mine the past posts in this part of the forum, you will find all kinds of lens comparisons and opinions. Figure out your vision, personal preferences and working style and find the best camera to suit that. If a TLR or SLR is not your bag, you can always sell it or trade it in.

    Peter Gomena

  8. #18

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    I am not familiar with the Rollei- as with most TLR it doesn't have interchangeable backs, correct? Being an amateur, I don't always use an entire roll at once and it's very nice to be able to switch between B&W and color mid-roll when you want to. I prefer the Hasselblad over a TLR (in general) because of the advantages of the SLR- easier to use filters and shades, no parallax, closer focusing ability, etc. In choosing you might want to consider how the types of images you want to take will determine the type of camera you need. For me, precise composition for closeups is really important.
    Keith Ostertag
    keitho at strucktower dot com

  9. #19

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    What about a Rolleiflex SL-66? A SLR, interchangeable backs, focal plane shutter, built-in bellows, allows tilting lens for depth-of-field correction. I used to own one, and I currently own Hassleblad cameras. The SL-66 was every bit as good a camera, and it also had Zeiss lenses. I had more Hassleblad stuff, and during a time of economic difficulty couldn't afford both systems at the same time.

  10. #20
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you forsee needing un-reversed, eye level viewing, you should be sure to find and try uing a Rollieflex with a prism.

    I haven't handled a Hassleblad for a while, but there are a wide variety of viewing options available for them, and as I recall, the prisms were very nice to use.

    I have a prism for my Mamiya TLRs and I use it fairly regularly, but it definitely is a lot heavier, and a lot less bright than the prism on my Mamiya SLRs.

    Matt

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