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  1. #11

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    Yeah, having only ever had matching inserts to my A12 backs I have no idea if it really makes any kind of discernible difference. My guess is, as you've said, we're looking at such finely crafted hardware that matching or not probably doesn't mean a hell of beans! Don't know if it's true, but I heard years ago through a reliable source that Hasselblad did use some sort of laser alignment or something to match the insert with the back. Not sure if it's simply that they put a sticker on the insert revealing the last 3 digits just so they match to fetch higher prices. But, hey, whadda I know...
    Regards,
    Alan Huntley
    www.silverscapephoto.com

  2. #12

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    If you are taking your Hasselblad on a trip and expect to go through a lot of film, I thoroughly recommend the A24 (220) back, as you will save a bit of room. 220 is a bit harder to find in shops but I buy all my film over the net these days so it isn't a problem.

  3. #13

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    The matching may have only made much difference on the older C backs. In a professional working environment the older "C" backs with their requirement of watching the film roll on thru a window to get to the first frame slows down the reloading somewhat, thus making the A-12 or variants more desirable. You can reload an "A" series back considerably faster. When using a "C" back with the rubber plug for 220, frame spacing (particularly on the last 12 frames) is less than ideal, and can get really wide towards the end of the roll. A more modern A24 back designed for 220 has perfect frame spacing. The first of the roll may have a slight bit of frame overlap. In the late 1960's I worked for a studio that shot Hasselblad with 220 film in "C" type backs and he cut his negatives into singles, with each one in a separate glassine sleeve...so spacing wasn't an issue. I like to cut my medium-format negs into 3-strips of 4 frames, and if I used a "C" type back for 220 I would not be able to get some strips of 4 into a page sleeve without the film sticking out the end of the sleeve.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    The matching may have only made much difference on the older C backs. [...]
    It's the same for all backs, A or non-A.

  5. #15

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    Backs in the fridge

    I have an off topic questions about backs. Has anyone ever loaded a back with film, and then left that back in the fridge? I have a few rolls of film loaded into a couple of backs that I haven't shot yet. And I'd like to keep the film as fresh as possible. Just wondering... thanks!

  6. #16

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    Haven't done it but.. Are the backs in sealed ziplock backs? And these bags in a freezer?
    If you, I would place the still sealed bags in the refridgerator for a few hours, and then remove.. Just so you don't go from frozen to condensation-everywhere.. not cool.

    I've done this with 4x5 film holders. I don't do it much anymore these days but you just have to seal it well, and let it cool down slowly. Don't open the bag until the condensation is gone or the bag is warm..

  7. #17

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    re: Phillip

    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip P. Dimor View Post
    Haven't done it but.. Are the backs in sealed ziplock backs? And these bags in a freezer?
    They're not in a freezer; I really don't freeze my film. So far, I have all of my individual film rolls in ziplock bags in a small fridge in my basement. The fridge is chilled at a low-moderate level. As for the backs, they're loaded with film, and they're just sitting in my camera bag next to the fridge. I'd say that on average, my basement is about 70 deg. Fahrenheit or so.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip P. Dimor View Post
    If you, I would place the still sealed bags in the refridgerator for a few hours, and then remove.. Just so you don't go from frozen to condensation-everywhere.. not cool.
    So, I'd be alright if I just left the backs in a ziplock bag in my small fridge (i.e., just like my individual film rolls)?

    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip P. Dimor View Post
    I've done this with 4x5 film holders. I don't do it much anymore these days but you just have to seal it well, and let it cool down slowly. Don't open the bag until the condensation is gone or the bag is warm..
    Okay, thanks a lot!

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon D. View Post
    They're not in a freezer; I really don't freeze my film. [...]
    It keeps longer if you do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon D. View Post
    So, I'd be alright if I just left the backs in a ziplock bag in my small fridge (i.e., just like my individual film rolls)?
    As long as you indeed keep the bag shut after removing it from the fridge until the content has warmed up to ambient room temperature.
    You do not want condensation to form inside the magazine, on the film and mechanism.

    Unless you are planning to store a loaded magazine for months, it would be easier to just keep the back with film at room temperature. Nothing bad will happen to it. Certainly not at 70 degrees F.

  9. #19

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    Awesome! Thanks for the help, guys!

  10. #20
    Philippe-Georges's Avatar
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    I doubt if Freezing is that good for the lubricants in the transport/counter mechanism, who knows?

    Philippe
    "...If you can not stand the rustle of the leafs, then do not go in to the woods..."
    (freely translated quote by Guido Gezelle)

    PS: English is only my third language, please do forgive me my sloppy grammar...

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