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  1. #11

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    The shutter on my Pentacon 6TL is quite smooth and very well damped. A lot better than my friends Pentax 67 (which is also load enough to wake the dead :o) I've not noticed any shutter induced lack of sharpness.

    Speaking to the guy that did the CLA on my camera, he claims that the P6 is generally well damped with a mirror brake, and generally does well without MLU. He also said that the Kievs really do need a MLU, as they generate much more vibration.

  2. #12
    kman627's Avatar
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    My Kiev 60 has very little slap, it sounds loud, but the camera stays relatively stable. My Bronica SQ-B was decent, but my RB67 has an excellent system with virtually no slap.

  3. #13
    Mike Té's Avatar
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    Kowa mirror

    If I remember my trivia correctly, the Kowa's (maybe just the Super 66) mirror moves up and out of the way with a bit of a built-in delay before the leaf shutter fires, allowing the vibrations to settle down before exposure. Does this ring a bell with anyone?
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

  4. #14

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    yes it does..

    Quote Originally Posted by tmike View Post
    If I remember my trivia correctly, the Kowa's (maybe just the Super 66) mirror moves up and out of the way with a bit of a built-in delay before the leaf shutter fires, allowing the vibrations to settle down before exposure. Does this ring a bell with anyone?
    Hi Mike..
    I've got 3 Kowa Six bodies and yes, the mirror does move up and there is a few milliseconds delay before the shutter fires. I do think this helps a bit when shooting hand held with it. The Kowa is a nice system overall. The only draw back is how hard it is to get them serviced..

  5. #15

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    I regularily shoot my Pentacon Six handheld. If your P6 is shaking the tripod, maybe something is wrong with it. I have shot some 35mm slrs that were louder. Maybe I just got lucky with my P6. It's never given me any trouble (oops.. shouldn't have said that). 13 perfectly spaced shots on a roll of 120, and 27 shots on a roll of 220.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  6. #16
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSindrey View Post

    Any comments appreciated.
    Can't say on your camera if the shutter or mirror cause the problems. Since my Rolleis have leaf shutters, I know where the problem lies. One solution I use for hand-holding a 6000 style camera is to increase the polar moment of inertia for upward rotation from the mirror slap. Also, I decrease the rotational angle of the scene on the film (ie: wide angle lens). Adding the viewing prisim and the monster 40mm Zeiss lens (old style) and the pistol grip lets me shoot at 1/30th without mirror pre-release.

    In comparison, with the camera tripod-mounted, waist level viewer and 80mm lens mirror pre-release is required for anything less than 1/500th (for 'critical work')

  7. #17

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    The only way to tell is by comparing the pictures to others shot with the mirror locked up. I have an old Bronica S2A. When you release the shutter, it sounds like a cannon going off, and the camera jumps in your hands. But the pictures are sharp, so the shock and vibration must all happen after the exposure. A friend shoots with a Pentax 67 and almost always has to lock the mirror up to get the results he wants. That big mirror has a lot of inertia and creates quite a shock when it moves out of the way. My Pentax 645, with a mirror about a quarter that size, has no problems.

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