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  1. #11
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    P.S. what does "make out like a bandit" really mean????
    Little or no work for good pay.

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  2. #12

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    I'd put in another vote for the RB67. It's a beast with the no.1 and no.2 tubes on together and a 140mm Macro with the bellows racked all the way out, and you'll need a whoppper of a tripod, but that combination will get you to about 1.2x lifesize on 6x7 that you can enlarge to 30"x40" easily. RB prices are just silly at the moment, and the camera will last you a lifetime.

  3. #13
    ChrisC's Avatar
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    Half you tried shooting your 4x5 with an enlarging lens mounted backwards? Opened up my eyes to an amazing world of macro shooting.

    The lens (which it sounds like you'd already have) with a rollfilm back would be very modestly priced.

  4. #14
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    Another vote for the RB67. Even just with a No. 2 extension tube and the standard 90mm lens you get 1:1 and a lot of fun. I spent an hour today peering at dandelions with mine.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  5. #15

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    If I were starting with a clean slate, I'd choose the RB/RZ, if I wanted to use the camera for more general work later on, I'd go with the Rollei.

  6. #16
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Most roll film backs should work for you. I have two of these http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...0496037&is=USE Wista backs (6x7 and 6x9) made for spring back cameras, but they also fit on Graflok backs. They are Graflok backs with metal "wings" to catch the spring back frame.

    4x5 gives you a wide range of lens choices. I was given a Polaroid camera designed specifically for oscilloscope photography a long while back with a 75mm f:1.9 Ilex lens designed for 1:0.85 reproduction. Covers 4x5 at that reproduction ratio, and roll film with good movement room. That may be too big for your Crown lensboards (No. 3x shutter), but there are many options out there.

    The RB/RZ and SL66 recommendations are also very sensible. The Fuji 680 came to mind when you first mentioned the project, but I'm not sure prices and availability are what you'd like to see. Hasselblad and Bronica pricing are probably also worth looking into if you want to cover your options.

    Lee

  7. #17
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Jason, I have a crown and have done some macro with that, it's quite good. Really nice for travel macro. Actually kinda light and not so stable as one might like. But anyway I normally use the Nikon 120 AMED for macro with the crown, and a diopter from time to time. Here are what I see as the disadvantages of the crown: GG composition at large mag with slowish lenses is not a pleasure for my eyes. Also there is no really convenient way to meter; bellows factor becomes a real headache. However you can go to high mag and get beautiful results, no question about it.

    Now, a fair amount of the flower macros I've done involved subjects that just aren't sitting still for long periods, so I find myself grabbing the rb and happily giving up a bit of WLF brightness for the TTL metering.

    Lens wise, I just don't think you can get any better than the newer RB lenses, and anyway, for macro you are often stopping down appreciably so it's kind of a wash. Having said that, the floating element rb lenses are quite a thing. My *only* gripe is that I wish they'd have put longer speeds (2 sec, 4 sec) into the macro lens and I wonder about slip-in aperture disks for improved bokeh.

    I do use a 612 back with the crown, it's good. But I think if you look at the cost of a rollfilm back for 4x5... and the cost of a motorized 6x8 back for the rb....
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #18
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    If you can find all the requisite parts and really want an SLR for macro, I like my Bronica S2a setup with the Type 2 bellows that has full view camera movements and can focus from infinity to the macro range, kind of like a 6x6 version of the Fuji GX680 system without some of the modern conveniences. The classic Bronicas are known for their complex and loud shutters, but I think any MF SLR needs a substantial tripod and head for macro, at least if you're not using strobes. I find myself using LF cameras more for macro these days.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  9. #19

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    I've had very good results from a Pentax 645n, their 120mm macro lens and extension tubes. As usual with MF macro, the biggest challenges are supporting the camera and lighting the subject.

    And before you ask, no, I haven't noticed any issues with mirror slap, but I'm sure it would be a problem at some speeds.

  10. #20
    craigclu's Avatar
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    I don't do much macro and have owned various P67 135mm macro lenses that I accumulated with systems purchases, etc. Anytime that I have duplicates, I take time to shoot some careful comparison shots and cull the loser (if I can tell a difference). I've had 4 of these go through my hands over the years. Not one of them has been tack sharp. In other focal lengths in the system, I've seen differences but always seem to find one that is very sharp and trustworthy. It seems odd that I've had a string of 135's that all look soft. Have I just had an incredible streak of bad luck or have others had the same experience? None of mine have been the very latest and the sharpest one that I kept has the old style grooved metal focusing grip.
    Craig Schroeder

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