Switch to English Language Passer en langue franįaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,856   Posts: 1,582,985   Online: 1074
      
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 52
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    "RB's are heavy and not really hand-holdable."

    The Pentaxes are just the same; they just don't look like it. If anything, the RB is more hand holdable in its stock configuration, because you are looking down into it and supporting it against your body. I agree that if you want things as simple as possible and don't need a bunch of accessories and such, the Pentax is a good option, but I would say that both of these are challenging to use hand held. If you want to hand hold either one, your best bet is a fast film that will allow the top shutter speed.

    Additionally, Pentaxes are pricier than RBs in my experience.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 09-15-2008 at 03:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    560
    Pentax 6x7s are quite easy to handhold with normal focal lengths. But let's look at the hard data with weight:
    6 lbs for RB67 with/WLF 120 Magazine and 127mm lens (source: Photoethanography)
    5 lbs for the P67 w/TTL finder and 90mm/2.8 (non Leaf shutter version). (source: Photoethanography and P67 lens info page)

    So a full one pound difference. Doesn't sound like much but if your a backpacker you know that's huge. You also see that I compared a P67 with TTL finder to a RB67 with no metering prism. So add another pound for a meter for your RB and you are pushing 7 pounds.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    "Pentax 6x7s are quite easy to handhold with normal focal lengths."

    ...and RBs don't even need to be held. They just hang, and you prop them up to shoot. Neither of these cameras are heavy or difficult to lift or hold or backpack. Difficultly begins with 8x10, IMO. But neither of them will make for a truly sharp hand-held shot unless you are using the fastest shutter speeds (and/or MLU). The hand holdability or non hand holdability of these cameras really comes from the lighting conditions, not the weight. They each have their pluses and minuses. To me, the big plus of the Pentax is its simplicity and solidity, and the 105mm f/2.4 lens. Pair that lens and a WLF to a Pentax, and you certainly have a great camera that can be hand held in good light. It will not be all that cheap, however.

    As to the meter, I would use a guess before I used an in-camera meter, so that is a moot point. I have never found a medium format in-camera meter that I like, or even a 35mm one that I truly love.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 09-15-2008 at 07:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Monterey Co, CA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    303
    If you never intend to go digital with it, go for an orphaned system (e.g.) no upgrade path to digital back.

    Might want to look at the Pentax 645N or NII. Built-in matrix, spot and center-weighted metering. Large number of lenses covering a wide range, many of them stellar performers and most of them now relatively cheap. Personally, I don't give a rat's behind for AF, but ED glass is available if you want. Yet the older manual focus lenses in that line are fully compatible with the matrix and spot metering of the later AF bodies. The older lenses also have exquisite all-metal build quality, on par with anything available, buttery helixes that are a joy to use. Too, lenses for their 6x7 system work on the 645 bodies with the Pentax adapter, in full automation. Film inserts are cheap and extremely quick to swap out in the field, though there's no mid-roll film changing.

    Only real negative I've encountered with the 645N/NII series is that to get faster than 1/60th flash synch, you need one of their leaf-shuttered lenses.

    Extremely well damped mirror in the 645N means you won't need the 645NII just for it's mirror lockup for tack-sharp results, this is an ergonomic camera that's eminently handholdable at slow speeds.

    Look at the original price tag, and then to compare it with other systems-- add up the incremental costs of the metered finders, motor winders, grips, backs, proprietary batteries (P645N likes 6AA NiMH just fine) and the value of a $350-400 P645N in Ex+ or Mint- becomes obvious. This stuff is going for 10 to 15 cents to the dollar on fleabay.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Polk County, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    49
    I'm weighing in with my 2 cents. Most of the systems discussed are good ones, have strong points, weak points, and such, but no one has addressed the functioning issue. I have an RB67 Pro S and seven backs for it. All of the backs needed the light seals replaced and six of them don't index properly when advancing the film. I recently upgraded to the RZ67 and love it. All three backs I bought to go with it are fine. I also have ETR series Bronicas (one ETRSi, two ETRS, and one ETRC) and five backs. I really love the ETRSi. It has mirror lock-up which is something the other ETR bodies lack. But, as with all equipment of this age (and having been used professionally for who-knows-how-long or how hard?) the light seals needed replacing and two of the ETR backs don't index properly. Where I'm going with this note is that Mr. Jones needs to realize that, unless he is extremely lucky, he's not going to have whatever equipment he decides on arrive and expect to go out for problem-free photography. A portion (and it can add up to a goodly portion) of his equipment budget needs to be allowed for shop work.

  6. #26
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,485
    Images
    20
    Even though the Pentax 67 looks like a 35mm SLR, the Bronica SQ system cameras feel more like a 35mm SLR than any other MF camera when equipped with a prism and winder grip. The winding lever is just where you expect it to be on the right side of the camera, operable with the thumb; it's light and easy to focus, and the distance between your eye and your hand all feels very natural, if you're used to shooting a manual 35mm SLR.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Gothenburg, Sweden
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    Unless you're looking for artsy holgaish cameras you're best off with a rangefinder or Twin lens relflex (TLR). Remember the lens is the only part of a camera that makes a difference in the end quality, the rest is a glorified box. I got the seagul chinese imitation and have been pretty pleased, but the optics could be a bit better. Look for a yashicamat of something of that nature. There is one TLR that you can change lenses, someone might be of help there.

    If you have money to burn or just want to show off you can get a Hasselblad. I'm not nearly an expert but I used one once and its completely awesome. Nice lenses too.
    Hasselblads are quite cheap today compared to yesterday. Try to afford one, get it overhauled if itīs old and you will have a cameera thatīll last your lifetime. And you wonīt regret the purchase either. Only adding some small extras to your outfit over the years, such as extra magasines, lenses and filters. That makes you concentrating on the pictures, which itīs all about!
    Cheers!
    Patrik Paulsson
    Gothenburg, Sweden

  8. #28
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Knutsen View Post
    Most of the systems discussed are good ones, have strong points, weak points, and such, but no one has addressed the functioning issue. I have an RB67 Pro S and seven backs for it. All of the backs needed the light seals replaced and six of them don't index properly when advancing the film. I recently upgraded to the RZ67 and love it. All three backs I bought to go with it are fine.
    Hmm... My experience was different. All 3 used backs I have acquired for my RB ProS system are perfectly fine. You had a run of bad luck, but I would not attribute an absolute "cause/effect" relationship based on either of our anecdotal experiences.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    560
    Good point about the backs not functioning- another reason to go with P67 in my mind. As long as a Pentax 6x7 winds correctly and the shutter fires you are pretty much good to go. No leaf shutter or back problems to deal with. On the other hand if you assemble a Bronica or Mamiya kit you have to hope the Camera works, the back works and the lens works (leaf shutters).

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    659

    Bronica GS-1

    The GS-1 6x7 is worth looking into. It can also produce 6x4.5 and 6x6 negs with the correct film backs. The GS-1 is extremely durable and user friendly with Zenzanon glass being second to none. Once you've printed a 6x7 negative you'll likely not want to go any smaller but with a GS-1 you'll have that option.
    "A certain amount of contempt for the material employed to express an idea is indispensable to the purest realization of this idea." Man Ray

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin