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  1. #11

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    If you have a need for speed, the modern 6008AF Rollei will win hands down, and the auto focus works as focus confirmation with all of the older lenses, which can be a great help in certain situations. The Schneider 90, 180 & 300 and the Zeiss 60 are all extraordinary. The Rollei lenses also have a clear future path to that D thing we don't talk about.

  2. #12
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    Jordan,
    I´m really fascinated by Rollei and especially the SL66,
    but I can only agree with the ones posted previous that if you call a nearly
    complete Hasselblad outfit your own, it would not make much sense to switch.
    Optics for the SL66 and Hasselblad are COMPLETELY identical (the only exception
    are the 50/4 Distagon to which FLE was added in the 80s and the 40/4 Distagon
    which was redesigned some two or three years ago. The FLE version of this
    has already been available for the SL in the 80s). The T* coating is COMPLETELY
    identical to the Rollei HFT, they just named it different in cause of legal issues.
    To make complex things short:
    SL66 is good for macro/landscape.
    Hasselblad is more suitable for flash photography.
    Rollei 600* is fast, modern and all electronic but depends on batteries.
    All of them are great cameras to use and capable of producing high quality pictures.
    My only advice would be to add a Rolleiflex TRL to your Hasselblad outfit,
    because they are small and lightweight. Older models are mechanical marvels,
    newer ones offer multicoating and built in lightmeters.

    best regards, Benjamin

  3. #13

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    Hasselblad (and possibly Rollei SL66, which I know only by reputation) and Rolleiflex TLR are totally different cameras when it comes to pretty much anything apart from picture quality…These are so different in nearly every way….get your hands on a Rolleiflex TLR and you will immediately see what I mean…

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    If your about to complete your Hasselblad system what do you want to achieve by comparing to Rollei's/Rolleiflexes, the optics are all equally as good, any minor differences not really worth bothering about.

    Do you want to find the Hasselblad inadequate

    Ian
    I think all of us photographers have a phobia that once we have a "complete" system that meets our needs, we retreat into some kind of psychological state that negates this satisfaction and we start looking for "the next big thing" and get scared that we'll be stagnant with one system forever.

    Sounds like relationship crisis.

  5. #15
    André E.C.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordanstarr View Post
    I think all of us photographers have a phobia that once we have a "complete" system that meets our needs, we retreat into some kind of psychological state that negates this satisfaction and we start looking for "the next big thing" and get scared that we'll be stagnant with one system forever.

    Sounds like relationship crisis.


    Speak for yourself, mate!:o




    André

  6. #16

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    If you'd like some hand-on exposure to the SL66 and the SL66E contact me in Lethbridge. morryk@telus.net

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by André E.C. View Post
    Speak for yourself, mate!:o
    I agree!

  8. #18
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    I think you need a thousand rolls of film and some time to yourself, not another system and I hope I don't offend you by saying this.

  9. #19

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    Perhaps when comparing quality systems the questions should be 1) does the system have what I need and 2) does it feel comfortable to use. You are asking about systems comparable in quality so IMHO these questions may be what you are really needing to think about. I went through 3 or 4 large format cameras (all well used) before I found one that both fit what I wanted to do and felt good to operate. My final choice was not any more expensive than one I did not like but in better condition and somewhat more movements. I was lucky in that I got to try out a Hasselblad system before spending any money on one and found I really did like using it and am almost at what I think of as a complete system(one more lens and a step up ring). I knew that I loved using it but had also used a Mamiya 645 years ago and have had a Rolleichord for three decades. It could also be that MF is not for you or that the 'blad is not right for you but I would not worry about it not being of sufficient quality as decades of pros using it would indicate otherwise. Perhaps a trip to the south to take Morry up on his offer would answer your question.

    If you bought all your equipment used and paid reasonable prices you would not lose that much money re-selling your system and getting a new one but then there is the shipping and time and money spent on learning and testing the new stuff.

  10. #20
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    I find the Rollies very difficult to use hand held. With the focusing knob on the side I find that I always have to switch hands to wind the film.

    I hold my Hasselblad in my left hand with my finger on the shutter release, focus and wind the film with my right hand. I can look through the magnifier in the hood and shoot an entire roll without having to take my eye off of it.

    I do, however, miss the swings and tilts that you get with the SL66. A Hasselblad arcbody is out-of-the-question expensive so for serious work where I'll need to correct perspective distortion I use a view camera.

    As far as the optics are concerned, I don't think that there's a particle of difference in quality between any of the 3 cameras.

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