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  1. #1

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    Roll your own 70mm film?

    Hey

    I might have an oppurtunity to buy some b&w 70mm film; however, I did some research and there are no 70mm film backs for my Mamiya. I'm wondering if it is possible to roll your own film into the equivalent of 120 or 220 sizes for ease of use.

    Thanks.

  2. #2

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    I am guessing that you are talking about 70mm perforated film. To use the film as 120, would require that both edges be trimmed off. The film should not be fogged or contaminated with dust. If the film is really inexpensive then perhaps a film slitting service would trim and package it as 120 or 220 for you. There is also a 70mm unperforated film. This would only require the one edge be trimmed off but I do not believe that this is a good venture for a home darkroom.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  3. #3
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    Shelly, I bought a 70mm bulk loader with 70 mm b&w and also some 64mm color film to likewise roll my own 120 and 127, especially the 127. If you look at 'the subclub' forum, in the darkroom section, for splitters, you'll see some ideas how you can make a simple tool for cutting your film to the proper width.http://www.subclub.org/darkroom/splitter.htm Save your 120/127 spindles and paper or do as some do and buy special paper to cut to size. I wish I could remember what it's called but there is an illustrators or animators black backed paper that used for this. Someone else here should be able to help you better with finding it.

    There are a number of folks that alter all kinds of film to fit their needs and there is no reason for you not to try and see if it's something you can do for yourself. However, I would not go so far as to call it easy. It makes more sense for me to roll 127 than you to roll 120. Unless you get a good deal on Techpan or some such, 120 is easy enough to come by and you may find the bother not to be cost effective enough to carry on with.

    What sort of film were you looking at getting for your camera and why do you like it?

    Cheers

  4. #4

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    I've done this. Although I used ortho film (kodak aerographic 70mm). I did know a man who shot only color film this way.. he would save his 120 spools and backing paper and just cut a section of film, slice the perfs off, tape it on and roll it up. It's doable, and if you have the time and patience it can work.
    I used a yardstick and an xacto knife to cut the film, I don't think i'd do that in the dark though.. or atleast be very careful. Perhaps a crank and some adjustable blades.. people who shoot minoxes and have to trim movie film have some good ideas on how to trim film.

    I've read of devices with rails and adjustable blades with a hand crank that are homemade.

  5. #5
    bowzart's Avatar
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    I have the bulk loader and cassettes, the backs to shoot 70mm. Is anyone making the stuff?

    I have a fair amount left. Some of my favorite films, such as Kodak's aerial version of their infrared film -- but will we ever be able to get ANY 70mm again? Do you know?

  6. #6
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    I think a crank set-up that feed the film through the lifted arm of an small, fixed in place, inexpensive paper trimmer, like scrapbook crafters use would do for cutting. The 'knife' on these is just a small point in a removable plastic slide and is quite safe. All you'd have to do is lower the arm when the right amount of film was rolled onto the crank/spindle and slide the cutter in its track to cut the film free. Those little cutters can slice through a lot of heavy card stock so thick film base should not be any sort of bother.

    Cheers

  7. #7
    eli griggs's Avatar
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    bwzart, a quick check of ebay show some guy in Israel with some 20 ft. tech pan in 70mm (he's also got 150 ft rolls of 35mm), there's some color stuff and some old Tri-X thats been stored in the freezer. I'm sure you can find it elsewhere as a regular or surplus item. What users are left for 70mm stuff, movie production, aerial photography; who uses it nowadays?

  8. #8

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    Thanks for the replies, everyone. I was looking at the Tri-x film, but I think that I'll pass on the 70mm, and just stick to your standard 120 rolls.

  9. #9

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    Far as I know, kodak still makes 70mm long rolls in 160 NC and 400 NC. Hopefully they will continue for a while. I use it in my 70mm roundshot pan camera. The big market for it was in the school student portrait market and it's pretty much gone digital, so it's anyones guess how much longer. As 120 film is easily available I wouldn't try to resize 70mm, due to the problems involved.

  10. #10

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    Well, if you have 1000ft of something nice in 70mm and some patience and time. You can 'make' a lot of 120 rolls, and possibly very cheaply too.
    Ask a local pro lab if you have one, or even a regular lab that does 120. Ask them if they can set aside their 120 spools and paper. That's a pretty good source if they do a fair amount of 120 work.

    I'm not sure about new film, those camerz long roll cameras have succumbed to digital and I always figured that was a major user of 70mm film.

    There's one 70mm back out there, be it hasselblad or mamiya or even graflex that doesn't care if it's perfed or not.. but I can't remember which.
    the graflex one might fit on your mamiya (? not my area of specialty)

    Eli, we think alike!

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