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  1. #1

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    Hassy 80mm question...

    I remember reading that under certain circumstances the non T* lenses are actually better at capturing contrast than the T* lenses.

    What was I reading and what were they talking about?

    Was I dreaming?

    Thanks
    Chris

  2. #2

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    I'm not sure. I have an 80mm C lens, non *T. It has a good single-coating but is definitely not multi-coated.

    I've never used a multicoated hasselblad lens, but I have used a multicoated pentax 645 lens. I get better contrast with the pentax, but with a good lens hood on the hassy it is practically like splitting hairs.

    Mine has a pleasing look. Soft and sharp, and it is contrasty enough for me.
    Not sure if that helps you at all..

  3. #3

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    Do you think there is a difference if it were being used outdoors or in a studio with the coatings?

    Thanks
    Chris

  4. #4
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    I used to have a non-T* 80, and now I have a CF-series lens which is T* multicoated. Both are equally sharp; the newer lens is contrastier and the images look more modern to me. I still prefer the newer one because the old one was very prone to flare, especially if used with no hood. Another consideration is that the C-series lenses (both the older non-T* and the newer T* versions) have a shutter and aperture control that is a real bitch to use because they're permanently linked. You have to pul back a button to change one of them and not the other. The newer CF series lenses do not have this and it is MUCH nicer to work with day to day.
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

    Become a fan of my work on Facebook

    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  5. #5

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    I agree, outdoors in strong daylight there is flare. A good hood really helps. OTOH, my multicoated pentax lens always fared a bit better.

    In the studio, unless you were shooting into a bright light.. probably wouldn't notice it. I still like the look of my non-t lens and use it. Well, it's the only one I own.

    As far as the lens shutter and aperture linkage. Yes, it's awkward. I got used to it pretty quickly. I actually prefer it at this point, especially with a meter that reads in EV's. It's quick.

    I'd imagine the newer lenses are nicer to use. They sure look nice.

  6. #6

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    In practice, under certain lighting conditions, a single coated lens can be as good as a multicoated one but I really cannot think of a reason, leaving all the aesthetic stuff away, how it could be better…optically better anyway…

  7. #7

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    The uncoated and single coated lenses tend to flare more, "filling in" the shadows, which in case of B&W photography can actually deliver a more graduated palette of grays on your final print. Thus some people enjoy using these lenses, and some manufacturers (CV) release even nowadays, special edition single coated lenses. The famous "Leica glow" has been born around flaring lenses with good resolution... Also, if you use a digital back with its somehow more limited dynamic range with respect to negative film, you might prefer a less contrasty lens.

  8. #8

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    I have used both types of 80mm Planars on Hasselblad cameras. There is no reason to consider the standard, non multi coated, 80mm Planar to be superior. It is however, a very nice single coating that is fully useable.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)



 

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