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  1. #11

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    The PME45 does flash metering?

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon D. View Post
    The PME45 does flash metering?
    No: but I do put it on the back of my large format cambo for a Ground Glass meter and also use it to meter through my Hasselblad mounted Imagon. I like it. Besides you can never have too many meters.
    Regards
    Bill
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

    Regards
    Bill

  3. #13
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I have a 503 CX and I use a metered prism, PME.
    1. The prism gets rid of the left-right reversal.
    2. The meter is very accurate.
    3. Some times I will take a reading without the sky, to check the center weighted reading. Usually, the readings are the same or close.
    I tired using a Sekonic handheld meter and I found that it was easier and more fun to use the all in one solution.

    When I need a spot meter I use my Nikon F-100!

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #14
    chef_IBK's Avatar
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    thx guys for the advices....ciao
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/th3ch3f


    ch3f.tumblr.com

    2 Hasselblad 500 CM Nikon FE2 Lubitel 166+

  5. #15

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    I would never trust a camera meter unless I had to. A great light meter is the best investment you can make in photo.

  6. #16
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Q.G. View Post
    The metering electronics inside the prism are not linked to anything else.
    TTL-flash metering is achieved by hooking a sensor inside some Hasselblad camera bodies, through the appropriate adapter, up to the electronics inside suitable flash units.
    Small correction: The flash metering is OTF - Off-The-Film, with an internal sensor directed toward the film, rather than Through-The-Lens. Potentially more accurate (taking note of the differences in film surface reflectivity) and immune to stray light coming through the viewing system.

    The independent Haaselblad system is GREAT - I absolutely love it for "fill" work!!
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #17

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    I would recommend having both, if that's financially feasible.

    I have a metered prism on my 503cx that lets me travel light and easy. With that setup it's just a matter of grabbing the camera and some film and heading out the door.

    But when weight and clutter-factor aren't an issue I'll also take my Sekonic 758D (which is what I use for flash metering as well).

    Having the options can really be an advantage at times.

  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tinyfailures View Post
    I would never trust a camera meter unless I had to. A great light meter is the best investment you can make in photo.
    You can trust a working Hasselblad metered prism. It will not give you tiny or large failures. Pun intended.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach View Post
    Small correction: The flash metering is OTF - Off-The-Film, with an internal sensor directed toward the film, rather than Through-The-Lens. Potentially more accurate (taking note of the differences in film surface reflectivity) and immune to stray light coming through the viewing system.
    Correction?
    O.K. Here's your correction!

    "Rather than Through-The-Lens" makes, of course, no sense.
    Before the light can bounce off the film, it has to come through the lens.

    So if you want to be pedantic, call it TTL OTF.

    Because it is influenced by the differences in film reflectivity, it is potentially less (!) accurate than non-OTF metering.


    Tinyfailures,

    The meter prism is "a great meter".
    Your distrust of built-in meters may be no more but a reflection of your past choice of camera(s) with built-in meter. Bad luck!
    Last edited by Q.G.; 11-24-2008 at 01:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    My distrust of built-in light meters is for indoor situations where I know whatever the meter is telling me will be 1-3 stops underexposed. And I'm not talking about 1+s exposures where you get into reciprocity. I've never used a 503 series Hassy. (The ones we have at school are 500 C/Ms.)

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