Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,283   Posts: 1,534,905   Online: 831
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    New York City
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,274
    Images
    31
    V, I have shot many thousands of rolls through
    various Rolleiflexes. Film flatness is not an issue.
    I shoot close portraits with a Tele Rolleiflex (same
    body as a normal Rolleiflex), wide-open at f/4 less
    than two feet from the subject. If film flatness were
    an issue, my portraits would not be possible.

    As for models, the 3.5E was my first Rolleiflex and
    it is still my first choice for shooting outdoors and
    on the road. I don't have much posted here any
    more but I shot this image from my APUG gallery
    with the 3.5E (warning, nudity):

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=37602

    It's a great camera. But most Rolleiflexes are. Don't
    get lost in the various models and lenses -- their
    differences are subtle, and user error dwarfs them.

  2. #12
    viridari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina [USA]
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    330
    Images
    22
    Hahaha I was all fired up to see the gallery of samples but I am a lowly freeloader so I can't see them. I'll have to take your word for it. I did find some good work (and some not so good work) on Flickr that gives me some idea of the possibilities.

    Thanks everyone for your help so far!

    (and I have to say, I'm impressed; this forum is so much more civilized than any of the others I've checked out)

  3. #13
    thebanana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,649
    Images
    121
    Welcome to APUG. It's cheap to join, and you'll get your money back in valuable information a thousand times over. The fist fights take place in the Soapbox, but I'm not sure you can enter without the proper ID
    "While you're out there smashing the state, don't forget to keep a smile on your lips and a song in your heart!"

  4. #14
    dpurdy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Portland OR USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,043
    Images
    38
    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    .
    A good, clean, well-working Rollei with perfect 4 element or more glass is an investment, not a purchase.
    I only wish I had taken the money I put into the stock market 1 year ago and bought Rolleis.

    I have done an awful lot of testing various Rolleis.. 3.5Fs and 2.8E2 2.8Fs 2.8FX and the consistency of quality is pretty amazing. And I have tested the 3.5Fs and 2.8E2 with the optical flat glass in place. The film flatness issue is not really an issue except if you have a roll of film sitting in a camera a long time so that the curl around the roller becomes permanent.

    A Rolleiflex is a really good camera as long as it hasn't had parts switched around, and can be serviced and rebuilt and made to last as long as you continue to use it. And it is a pretty good investment.
    Dennis

  5. #15
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    There is nothing wrong with any Rollei, but with your budget, you could probably get a three-lens Mamiya TLR system that would be much more versatile than any Rollei TLR. You have seven focal lengths from which to choose with that system, bellows focusing, and if you get one of the later models (one with three digits in the model number, or one of the two digit models that accepts a 220 back door), you have both 120 and 220 shooting ability. I would just deal with the weight, since they are nowhere near what I would call "heavy".

    This being said, decent, working Rolleicords can be had for around $100, and they are very small and light. This would be a great way to go if you don't want wides or close focusing ability. The only "normal" focal length Rollei I would buy would be a 'Cord, because they are dirt cheap. Once you surpass the price of a Mamiya to buy a 2.8 'Flex, I feel you might as well just get the Mamiya.

    As far as differences between lenses, forget about it. They are all good enough.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 12-16-2008 at 01:02 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #16
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,242
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by viridari View Post
    For the last several months, I've been lucky to enjoy a Mamiya C330 that was loaned to me by a friend who introduced me to the joy of shooting film.

    I believe that loan is coming to an end soon.

    I've saved up a little money for more strobist gear, but if I'm going to be deprived of what has become my favorite camera, I'd like to fill its place rather quickly. While I do love the C330, my neck does not. I do enjoy going for long walks around downtown Raleigh so I'd appreciate something lighter. . . . . . . .

    While my research tells me that I might be happy with a Yashica Mat 124 or 124G, I know that if I get one I'm still going to want a Rollei. I might as well just nip that in the bud and get the Rollei first and be done with it. . . . . . . .
    I have to agree about the weight of the Mamiya's, I had two until they were stolen. The Yashica 124's are good cameras the lenses are excellent, they are a little lighter than the Rolleiflexes, but this is reflected in the build quality which isn't as high as the Rollei's.

    Over the years I've used a variety of MF cameras and like others none have had an issue of film flatness, but film doesn't get left in them more than a few days. The only time I've ever heard of people having problems has been with older bellows cameras where opening the camera quickly can pull the film the film towards the lens.

    Given the choice a Rolleiflex is definitely the better camera to buy, it will last far longer than a Yashicamat, and also be more reliable, I have both.

    Ian

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New Jersey (again)
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,976
    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    I know, I have a Rollieflex 2.8F Planar, Rolliecord Xenon ...
    One small correction: The Rolleicord never came with a Xenon -- only the Xenar and before that the Triotar (a well-designed triplet).

    To the original poster, the biggest visible difference that you'll see in the Tessar/Xenar and the Planar/Xenotar is in close to medium distances shot wide open to about f/5.6. The Tessar/Xenar lenses tend to give round out of focus areas, while the Planar/Xenotar backgrounds tend to be much smoother.

    Once you hit f/8 and smaller, the differences tend to disappear.

    Also, the Automat models tend to be lighter in weight than the C-F models.

    Bottom line: You can't go wrong with a Rolleiflex, and if you really want a Rolleiflex, then buy one the first time out. There are a lot of cameras out there that have seen professional use, and that means they've been worked hard.

    Nothing wrong with that, but do keep in mind that any 50+-year-old camera will benefit from a good overhaul.

    As always, be sure to check for cleaning marks on the lens and mold/fungus, and also impact damage to the camera. Good luck!

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Kuiper Belt
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    291
    My suggestion: a Rolleicord V, especially the Vb. Very nice machine. Quality is equal to a Rolleiflex; complexity is lower. Harry Fleenor usually has one or more to sell. I have one from him, overhauled. It was in like-new condition.

  9. #19
    mjs
    mjs is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Elkhart, Indiana (USA)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,105
    Images
    2
    I have an older, New Standard, Rolleiflex from March, 1939. Although uncoated, the lens is incredible; just gorgeous negatives color or b&W. Including the CLA, I paid less than half of your budget. My heirs can dispose of this when I'm gone; I won't sell it before then.

    Mike

  10. #20
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,178
    Quote Originally Posted by viridari View Post
    So are you suggesting that this is particularly a problem with the camera that I'm asking about?
    The potential for lack of film flatness is a recognized limitation of the medium format rollfilm design; acknowledged by both camera and lens manufacturers. Weather you observe it depends on how critical you are and knowing the typical manifestation. Luck, or lack of it also plays a role. In general, the Rollei TLRs have a pretty good film path, so factors contributing to film bulge are more likely going to be film type, ambient temperature, and time elapsed between winding frames. In many (most) cases the film is held flat. On critical examination, every one of my MF rollfilm cameras has exhibited film bulge at least once at some point during my ownership. (33 years for the 124G).

    Realize that Rollei did make a glass plate to force the film flat and incorporated a vacuum back on one film back in the 6000 series. The glass plate is not popular, as dust can be a nightmare. Also, as indicated, film flatness without the glass can be excellent.
    Last edited by ic-racer; 12-17-2008 at 10:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin