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  1. #11
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I can't agree with that. The Rolleicord has all the build quality of the Rolleiflex but is simpler. Therefore there is less to go wrong such as the interlink between the wind on lever and the shutter cocking mechanism.


    Steve.
    Not according to the repairmen I have talked to. The cord is an economy model and wont hold up to the same amount of use. But that is something I have to take other's word for as I have never owned one or taken one apart. Over in the Rollei Users Group where a lot of people have worked on them they say the cord and Yashica are similar quality.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    Not according to the repairmen I have talked to. The cord is an economy model and wont hold up to the same amount of use. But that is something I have to take other's word for as I have never owned one or taken one apart. Over in the Rollei Users Group where a lot of people have worked on them they say the cord and Yashica are similar quality.
    I wouldn't disagree with anything said above, but it is important to remember that they filled the amateur niche, not a professional niche in the Rollei product line. With that in mind, it remains a fine and reliable camera for an advanced amateur to consider. I'm assuming that the OP is not using the TLR for professional purposes.

    I bought a "low mileage" Rolleicord Vb in the mid-1980s, had it overhauled once in the late 1980's and it was my favorite travelling camera until about 2003 when I "retired" it. I even used it for several months in military helicopters and airfield operations to document operations. Never once did it let me down... and I'm sure if I poulled it out of hte closet today it would continue being a star performer.

  3. #13

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    Rachelle

    It depends on what you shoot. I have a Bronica SQa that I've had for years. It's a great outfit. I also have two Rolleiflexes. Totally different camera for different use. With the Bronica you get the advantage of interchangable lenses, film backs and finders. With the Rolleiflex, what you have is what you get.

  4. #14

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    I will definitely recommend a Rolleiflex. I personaly prefer the f3.5 models. Fine if you can afford a Planar or Xenotar. But even a Tessar is hard to beat. And Tessars are quite a bit cheaper and most models are slightly lighter than the P or X models. Any of the above would make a good workhorse for life.

  5. #15
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for the responses so far. Just a few comments:

    One thing I learned is that I'd rather buy a good camera than waste time buying some piece of crap I'll wish I hadn't bought and just bought the good one the first time

    Well, I certainly don't consider the Autocord a piece of crap, and I have absolutely no regrets about buying it. And, I'm reluctant to pay the kind of money that Rolleiflexes command (for a good one) when I can buy into a bigger system with the same kind of money. Also, as mentioned, in the past, it was a lot easier to come up with $100 for a TLR than 10x that for a better MF system.

    I'm assuming that the OP is not using the TLR for professional purposes.

    Absolutely true. Which is why I shoot with a TLR in the first place (although it's not my primary camera). A couple of votes for the Mamiya, a couple for moving to a SLR system...I just don't know! I guess I just have to determine whether or not the limitations of a TLR are really hindering my photography, and if moving to a bigger system will 'fix' the problems I perceive to have with the TLR.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by mooseontheloose View Post
    I guess I just have to determine whether or not the limitations of a TLR are really hindering my photography, and if moving to a bigger system will 'fix' the problems I perceive to have with the TLR.
    It's only worth it if you want to use a variety of lenses (although the Mamiya TLR offers an alternative there). "Piece of cr@p" is a subjective assessement. Some would call the Rolleicord a "POC" compared to a 'flex but I've produced some decent pics to disprove that. Maybe some of them are... but generally that is because some folks buy a old, cheap camera and can't invest in bringing it back into servicable condition. For me the ability to get accessories, servicing, and repair parts has been part of my definition of desireable vs undesireable for any type of older camera choice.

  7. #17

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    The Autocord is a fine camera that is generally worth fixing. Perhaps you should try a different repair shop.

  8. #18
    Allan Swindles's Avatar
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    I'd have to agree with dpurdy and go for a Rollieflex. My 3.5F is over 40 years old and only recently needed a service due to having been bounced, not by me I might add, and is now as good as new. I have used it for professional wedding and commercial work during this time without any problems and is first choice tool for weddings. The Planar lens is superb. I also have a Hasselblad 500C/M and lenses which I love dearly, but it isn't a light and portable as the Rollei. If you don't need interchangeable lenses stick with the TLR. SLR's are great, but they make you buy things, or create a desire for other lenses, tubes, magazines etc. which you do not need. Although it's a long time since I've handled a Mamiya TLR, I seem to recall they were heavier and bulkier that the Rollei/Yashica/Minolta models and IMHO you might as well go SLR as choose that option. You will not surpass the reliability and performance of a Rolleiflex TLR.
    I'm into painting with light - NOT painting by numbers!

  9. #19
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    A final thought, Loose-Moose; and I express it at the risk of being hooted off the board. Some years back, I purchased a Ukrainian Hasselbladski--a Kiev 88, to see if I liked the feel of that kind of camera before sinking the golden grickles into a real "Blad.
    I kind of like the feel; and thus far have not sprung for the real thing. Despite all the criticism about reliability, this thing has just plugged along every time I choose to take it out to play. I did eventually have to have the aperture blades on the prime lens cleaned, but the whole outfit cost me 255 dollars and change about ten years ago, which included a metered prism. Perhaps I will have to get the Blad someday, after I dispose of other medium format equipment I use less and less now--a Yahica 635 and a Yash 12; and a Pentax 6x7Also, I must admit, I also kind of like the anti-snobbery of my proletarian Swedish lookalike. Now, back to my Argoflex!.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  10. #20

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    I have watched used camera prices for over 40 years. Rollei and Leica cameras seem to be the leaders in holding their value. I too would recommend a Rollei 3.5F with the Planar lens. Their is a very good chance that you will never need to have it serviced.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

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