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  1. #1
    reverend jay's Avatar
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    Sell My Hasselblad for a Mamiya 6 or 7???

    I was considering selling my Hasselblad 500c/m so that I could get a (preferably) Mamiya 6 or possibly a 7. I am looking for something more portable and although i love my Rolleiflexes for this I feel the Mamiya would give me the ease of faster shooting for street shots.
    I don't feel the Hasselblad always has to be on the tripod, but it is more cumbersome then a Mamiya.
    I was just concerned about the build quality and the rangefinder adjustments of the Mamiya.
    Any thoughts on this?

  2. #2
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    I would try to find someone who will loan you a Mamiya 6 or 7 for a short while. It isn't for everyone. On the other hand if you buy used you should be able to sell and get your money back if it doesn't work out. My personal experience is that i get impressed with the sharpness of a friends work and I have asked to use his camera awhile and it takes about 10 minutes to decide I just could never use that camera. There are issues with range finders and the close focus and the slowness of the lenses that bother some and not others.

  3. #3
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    Rev, I second dpurdy's suggestion. I love my Mamiya 7---it was my first rangefinder, coming from a succession of 35mm and MF SLR's---but it took some getting used to. I think you will find that it complements the Hasselblad, more than it would replace it. I have a Contax 645, and I wouldn't dream of replacing it with the Mamiya 7. The Contax is the more versatile of the two systems; but for shooting on the go---street, architectural, environmental portraiture, urban landscapes---the Mamiya is a joy to use

    Biggest drawbacks with the M7 are the lack of close-focusing capability; the inaccurate framing compared to the lowliest SLR; the relative difficulty of focusing (compared with, say, a SLR with a split microprism); the cumbersome film loading.

    To the good, the M7 lenses are simply superb. With the possible exception of the Contax, none of my other systems' lenses come close to them in sharpness and contrast.
    Michael Sebastian
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  4. #4
    reverend jay's Avatar
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    Yeah this is a tough decision because I think I would regret getting rid of the Hassy but I am not sure if it suits my shooting style anymore. It is a pure work of art though in it's design.

  5. #5

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    I rented the Mamiya 7 once to try it before I committed to buying one and it wasn't everything I hoped it would've been in terms of ease and speed. Admittedly, I was a novice with rangefinders and found focusing vertical shots very challenging, primarily because it was awkward finding a comfortable position for my hands (right hand above or below?), getting used to the viewfinder in the left corner, and trying to see the rangefinder spot. The camera also felt about the same height/width as a Canon 1-series, albeit lighter and not as deep, so it wasn't that much more compact than a Hassleblad, just different shape.

  6. #6
    arealitystudios's Avatar
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    I was in your exact same position about a year ago. I love my Hasselblad, but it just wasn't a great camera for random street shooting and the Mamiya 7 seemed like the way to go.

    Luckily the local pro shop had one I could rent for a weekend and I was really glad I did. I found the camera was not really what I had hoped it would be. It was still relatively big and heavy and though it had a decent enough grip I still found myself staring at it on the shelf when I was going out for a day trip and thinking, "do I really want to lug THAT around all day?"

    I ended up buying an old classic Agfa folder for about $200 refurbished and cleaned and I'm happy to say it fit the bill perfectly. I was able to keep my Hasselblad (a 500 C/M also) for the important studio and planned out stuff, and the folder hangs out in the side pocket of my messanger bag on a day to day basis for street shooting.

  7. #7

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    I really like my Mamiya 7; it's easy to carry about for the entire day and the results are stunning. Yes, rangefinders do have limitations. But I've had no problem living with the limits. But I prefer environmental portraits to tight head shots anyway.

  8. #8
    Nicole's Avatar
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    I'd recommend keeping the Hasselblad and adding to it, if you can. There will always be situations where one will be a better choice than the other for whatever reason. I'd also highly recommend you hire/rent the Mamiya 6 or 7 for a week or two before you decide to buy or switch. Good luck!

  9. #9

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    Hasselblad or Mamiya 6 or 7

    I bought a Mamiya II and three lenses. Shot a lot of slides in India (for a month). It is a nice camera, but I kept my Blad and sold the Mamiya, primarily because I don't care for the 6x7 format. I shoot 6x9 for landscapes, keep the Blad for closeups, macro and portraits.

  10. #10

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    Rent one, make sure you try changing lenses, etc. I did. The results were excellent, but changing lenses is a PITA, and I thought the build quality of the body and feel of the winder lever were sub standard.

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