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  1. #11

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    The older lenses maybe hard to get parts for but they are still a good buy. Had my 500cm for over thirty years with very little problems,only had it serviced twice ,4 lenses 1 body,3backs. Although the last 10years have been very lite duty,the first 10years had heavy abuse and use with very little problems. The 50mm lens is awesome I think,sharp and has little distortion for its coverage. All are cm lens except the 150mm c.

  2. #12
    lmn
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    Just wanted to second the suggestion of ordering from http://www.david-odess.com/

    Am very, very happy with my purchase from him.

  3. #13
    david b's Avatar
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    Buy the best and newest you can afford.

    $1400 should get you a late 1990's 501cm with 80mm CB and possibly a 80mm CFE.

    Learn the system with the 80mm and then buy the 50 or 60 later

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronlamarsh View Post
    I am looking to get into a Hasselblad system but know little about it. I will probably only be able come up with $1100 to $1400 to begin with. The variety of body models is confusing and I know little about the features of various models.
    So, what is the difference between a 500C and 500CM? Do both have mirror lockup? Will both accept the full line of lenses? For lenses I am a slightly wide to slightly tele kind of guy: so I was thinking along the lines of 60mm and 120 to 150mm to start with........good, bad or what would be better? I like the idea of a 50mm but the cost is way up there. Thanks in advance for all the opinions.
    There are umteem dozen ways of putting a Blad kit together, when I got into the system in the early 80's VH catalogs and handout booklets listed suggested kits. The standard kit for the "beginner" was the 50+80+150. Some photogs went with the 60+120. It kind of doesn't matter what you start with cause you will eventually want one of everything, case in point, when I got my 50 I was thrilled, used it all the time, it is a fantastic piece of glass but when I picked up a SWC at a good price I just about quit using the 50. Don't be afraid of the age of a 500CM, they are high quality, built to last and with proper servicing (David Odess) will last you a lifetime. The newer versions have the bigger mirror which won't cut off the image in the viewfinder when you are using lenses of 150mm or longer. whatever you get try to get the brightest focusing screen also. Do some research before you buy to narrow down what you actually want/need. A good book is "The Hasselbald Way" by Wildi. Good luck.

  5. #15
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Swindles View Post
    "The older C-series lenses are a pain to use because the shutter and aperture settings are locked together. You have to hold in a tab to change either setting independent of the other."

    Absolute nonsense! The reason for this is so that the EV remains constant if you need a quick shutter speed or aperture change.
    Hardly nonsense. When do you need a "quick shutter speed or aperture change" unless the light has changed or you're bracketing expsure? in both cases, the EV setting changes, meaning you have to unlock the coupled settings. I had a c-series 80mm for several years and I despised it. I finally sold it and got a CF 80mm and it has greatly speeded up my work. At that point 80mm was my only Hassy lens. I now have a 150mm CF and a 50mm CF-FLE. When I bought those I gladly paid nearly twice as much for the CF model because I am a professional photographer and my time is worth money. Also, the FLE version of the 50mm Distagon is considerably better than the non-FLE 50 (both the CF and C 50. The CF was later made in the FLE version that I have, but older CF 50's are the same optics as the C 50).
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

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  6. #16

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    It's obvious that having a choice of having both shutterspeed and aperture rings coupled or not (CF and later versions) is more convenient than having them coupled all the time. Is it not?


    The thing that should always be high on the list when buying used stuff is age.
    You never know what a bit of equipment has had to put up with since it left the factory. So look for how much chance it has had, how much opportunity there has been for it to have been abused. The younger, the better.

    But it of course is not the begin all end all. Old stuff may still have lots of usefull years left in it. It also depends on how well built things are to begin with (in another thread we can read that there are no 'professional' cameras. Well, there are. Some are made to withstand continuous hard use. Others will start needing things repaired and replaced after a trifling 10 years of day-in day-out use.)

    And as long as there are still people capable of giving proper attention to maintenance and repair of old stuff, age becomes even less important.


    The optics of most lenses have not changed indeed.
    There are a few notable exceptions. The 40 and 50 mm lenses mentioned are among them.
    The FLE CF or CFi version of the 50 mm Distagon is indeed to be prefered over the 'regular' CF or C version.
    But not that the non-FLE was a bad lens. It wasn't, isn't. It's just that the FLE is a better lens.

    The 500 mm Tele-Apotessar, and the 350 mm Superachromat are also optics that were improved over time.


    The 60 mm plus 120 mm set would be a good one. Very versatile.
    I use a 60 mm plus 150 mm in my 'walkabout without a specific purpose'-set, and i can't remember when i last wished i had another lens in my bag. A 120 mm obviously is very close to the 150 mm, and would do just as well.

    But you will eventually want to add lenses. A 40 mm at the wide end, a 250 mm at the long end, and something in between too (the 80 mm - much maligned - really is a great lens!).


    Apart from age, the difference between a 500 C and a 500 C/M is that you can change the focussing screen in a C/M yourself. Of the two, i would pick the 500 C/M.

    Both offer mirror prerelease (not "lock up" - mirror lock up is a thingy that (guess... ) locks the mirror in the up position, i.e. puts it there and keeps it there, no matter what else happens. Despite the widespread misuse of the term, very few cameras offer mirror lock up. Of the Hasselblads, only the 2000-series cameras do).
    But i'm sure you meant prerelease (the mirror is moved up before the exposure, allowing any movements it causes to dampen before the exposure is made. It comes down again as soon as you rewind the camera), so: yes.
    Last edited by Q.G.; 03-28-2009 at 06:43 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    There have been a couple posts suggesting to buy from Dave Odess, I think there is a better way.

    I use Dave for all my Hasselblad repairs, but I think he is pretty high on his used stuff. I've done a lot better looking for bodies/lens on Ebay that low shutter speeds are slow, or body needs CLA and send them straight to Dave for CLA or repair.

    I have found this to be much cheaper than buying Dave's gear. Plus, I still a body/lens ready to go for a very reasonable price.

    If you get a C, I have a C, C/M and ELM, watch out for the very early ones. They are totally different on the inside and Dave says there isn't much he can do with them. Don't remember the year right off the top of my head, but as you look at the front of the body there is a small hole in the top left corner. Don't know what's its for, but I'd stay away from those bodies.

    Mike

  8. #18
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    For camera purchases check out keh.com and http://www.david-odess.com/

    http://www.david-odess.com/ is good for Hasselblad repairs too.

    Steve
    When I bought, I decided to buy an overhauled set from David and it was about $1400 (500CM, 80mm CF lens, back, waistlevel) if I remember correctly. Works as good as new and I am not afraid that it will let me down.

  9. #19

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    Might I suggest you get the 500cm , standard lens a few extention rings and most importantly a prism . That is all you need ,and any spare cash will be best invested in film .

  10. #20
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    If it is a 6x6 SLR you are looking for, and not specifically a Hasselblad, you should also consider Bronica SQ-A or the newer SQ-Ai. Great cameras and lenses, and cheaper than Hasselblad equipment.

    Trond

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