Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,691   Posts: 1,548,930   Online: 817
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Chino,Ca.
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    153
    Images
    8

    Loading in the dark?

    All of my MF cameras (Yashica and Voigtlander tlrs and RB67 ) require that you line up a start mark on the film backing with a mark in the camera or back before closing and winding on so that the camera knows where to stop for the first exposure.
    How do you do this in the dark or in a changing bag when loading infrared?
    I've searched but didn't find this addressed.
    thanks for any help.

    Larry

  2. #2
    dpurdy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Portland OR USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,055
    Images
    38
    How about loading the film in a room that is so dark you can just see the marks? Does it have to be absolute black?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Holland and Brazil
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,066
    I would load your camera's in subdued light.

    Peter

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,283
    Images
    21
    I've always loaded 120 IR film in subdued light, with acceptable results. There's sometimes fogging on the edges (outside the image area), but I'm not sure when it occurs---in any case it's never been a problem.

    My understanding is that the reason you have to load 35mm IR in the dark is because of light piping through the film leader, which shouldn't be an issue with 120 because the "leader" is just backing paper.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  5. #5
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Keeping the British end up in Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,870
    Images
    333
    All I can say is that 120 IR Film like SFX, or Maco, need subdued light, but it depends on the type of IR film you are using. For something like Efke 820c which is the highest sensitivity IR based film there is outside of the old Kodak IR film, I would load in VERY low light levels. More importantly, an area with not much heat in it helps as well. Not all 120 film backing papers are totally IR safe either. YMMV.

    As Nathan pointed out, 35mm IR film is a load and unload in total darkness arrangement only. You will also need to cover the little film ID window on the back of some slr's with a piece of foil and gaffa tape.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  6. #6
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    Being careful with handling, I have never had a problem loading in open shade.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    77
    For your next roll, load in subdued light, as suggested, and track the number of knob turns (or lever cranks) it takes to get the arrow to its mark. On the following roll, load in total darkness, using that estimate, then go a half turn more to be safe. You'll probably want to eliminate the last frame rather than gamble on missing part of the film area, but it should guarantee that there'll be no fogging on the first 11 (or 9).

  8. #8
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    735
    Images
    21
    If you like TLRs you should try a Rollei. They have a sensing mechanism that detects the beginning of the film. I always found this superfluous but in your case it would make sense.
    Greetz, Benjamin

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,283
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Slixtiesix View Post
    If you like TLRs you should try a Rollei. They have a sensing mechanism that detects the beginning of the film.
    That's a good point, and TLRs are pretty much ideal for shooting IR. Not all Rolleis have the sensing mechanism, though; my Rolleiflex (2.8C) has it, my Rolleicord (III) doesn't, and I don't know if it's just 'flexen vs. 'cords or if the situation is more complex than that.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  10. #10
    EASmithV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,874
    Blog Entries
    4
    Images
    123
    The reason you need to load 35mm IR in the dark is because it has no antihalation dye, and will fog down the entire roll. IME, this is not an issue with MF.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin