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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    2
    I am sure to be in the minority here, but for my medium format activities I have long shot Kodak Tech Pan and I develope it in Ethol. This allows me to rate the Tech Pan @ ISO 100 and the Ethol gives pretty good pictorial negatives. Watch the time in the soup so the contrast does not build up and KEEP THE TEMPERATURE AT 68 DEGREES. I go by the recommended time. The Ethol is much cheaper than Kodak's Tech Pan Developer, but the main advantage is that I can shoot at 2 stops faster and the negatives are very smooth grained.....................piniongear

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ottawa
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    97
    I take the opposite view. Only one film?! No thanks. I love making the choice and varying. That's part of the pleasure, at least if photography is a hobby. Maybe it's different for those who make it a profession. I tend to settle on just a few films I use regularly anyway, but I wouldn't straigthjacket myself by categorically deciding I'm only going to use one film.

  3. #23
    frank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Bit north of Toronto
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    HP5+ film in Ilfosol dev. for 35mm, 120, 4x5, and 5x7: simple yet effective.
    My blog / photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

  4. #24
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    Jul 2003
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    I've been everywhere ooooohhh yeaahhhh still I'm standing tall.
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    Delta 3200 is one of my favourite films in MF, because I do so much available dark portraiture -it's a godsend and gives lovely negs when semi stand developed in PCAT HD.
    Also: APX 400 in PMK-tonality that's good enough to eat and reminiscent of older style thicker emulsion films. Still mourning Verichrome, but looking forward to trying EFKE/Fomapan. Like the tonality of XP2 as well, and it's so handy when you're away from your darkroom for long periods of time.
    If you pick a range of 3 or so films and devs for regular use, and then try something new every so often, then I feel that that's a reasonable balance.
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    15
    Current love affair in monochrome is Delta 3200 for 35mm or medium format - developed in DDX (1+4) as a one shot process. Film rated anywhere from ISO 200 up to ISO 256000. I have found it to be a very versatile film. Slower emulsion choice is Pan F or FP4 in IDII as a one shot process. Looking forward to trying EFKE films for 4x5
    JeffC

  6. #26

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    california
    Posts
    1
    For a single black and white film, I have standardized on Ilford XP2 Super. I Shoot it at 200 iso, not 400 iso. It is incredible. This is a C41 film, processed in color chemistry. I simply take it to a nearby one hour photo shop and wait about 10 minutes for them to process it in C41 chemistry. I then scan the 120 or 35mm negs. Life is beautiful with this set up. No more darkroom for me. My Leica M3 or Hassleblad 500c with this film gives me the most fantastic black and white images I have ever had. The film is idiot proof. Read about it on the net. Much has been said. I only wish it was available in sheet film. This is the only black and white film I will ever need.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Near LA (Cerritos) Ca
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    There sure are a lot of opinions. I read Chris Johnson's book, The Practical Zone System, and then started thinking about switching from HP 5. That was a couple of years ago and what I settled on was Delta 400. I used/started with part of Chris' suggestions by exposing at E.I. 200 and developing in D-76, 1 to 1 for 9 minutes at 68 degrees. I was having trouble with my highlights - they were too dense - and so now I develop for 7 minutes which is working just great for me. I suggest you try your own experiments though. Good luck.

  8. #28
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
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    5,029
    Since I have a hate affair with Kodak, I use a little as possible.

    I use Ilford FP-4 for most things and Zonal Pro Gamma Plus developer.

    This is all in 6x6.

    I agree, find one combination and learn it's ins and out thoroughly and get used to it. Then every once in a while experiment with something else.

    The nuances of these things are rarely seen by beginners and so they are better off to just pick one and use it, until they develop an eye for what they like and don' t like.

    Michael McBlane

  9. #29
    esanford's Avatar
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    Apr 2004
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    Hertford North Carolina
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    I'll start with your basic question: Do you tend to standardize on one film? My answer is a resounding YES!!! I started experimenting around with a lot of films, papers, and developers in my early days of photography and got myself hopelessly confused. I then read one book by a grand old photography teacher who said stay with one film, one paper, and one developer etc... I immediately chose a film and developer then a paper (I've since changed papers because the first one I chose was discontinued). I did this 12 years ago and it transformed my photography from a lot of sloppy junk to some "credible work". Mainly, I isolated variables such as film speed and developer time. I also learned how to expand the film (i.e. Zone System N+ development), and generally learned all of the properties of that film. I used (still use) it for everything from landscapes, portraiture, et. al. After 12 years, guess what? I still haven't completely explored all of the possibilties, subtleties and nuances of that film. Also, no matter what others say, I resist the temptation to change because I don't want to go back and do all of the testing and calibrating that I've done over the last decade. So... I would recommend this to anyone. By the way that film is old Kodak Tri-X and HC110 printed on Ilford Gallerie graded paper. When Kodak discontinued the old Tri-X I bought several hundred rolls of it and placed it in my freezer. At some point, I may try the new Tri-X once my old supply runs out. I spend most my time learning to be a good photographer rather than a chemist. In summary, choose a film and go for it, then spend your time making well seen pictures.

  10. #30
    gr82bart's Avatar
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    Mar 2003
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    Culver City, CA
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    Since I've 'standardized' my colour film to chromes, I've also standardized my B&W to Scala. Just a personal preference for me, but I love the look of transparencies on a light table!

    Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

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