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  1. #11
    blansky's Avatar
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    Donald wrote

    What Michael has failed to elaborate on is that he really only keeps the meters laying around to impress the mothers of the youngsters that he photographs. Michael has developed his sensitivity to light to such an extent that he can "feel' the light intensity to within a 1/3 of a stop.
    Actually Donald that was a while ago. You are right, I can ascertain the light to within a 50th of a stop merely by glancing at the subject.

    However now I have developed a special disposable meter that I have clients swallow, so that I can get a better reading of their " inner glow" or their "essence" if you will.

    This has always been a challenge for us portrait types that feel the need to capture their subjects "essence". A portrait with an underexposed essence has always been a pet peeve of mine.

    With this new meter, I'm now better able to balance the strobes with this essence and make a far more revealing portrait.

    I'm planning to put this invention on the market soon and will market it under the name "the Glow Worm".

    In our early trials, some people were experiencing a phenomena we called the "Glow Worm Squirm" but since most were kids we didn't see anything unusual. Trouble was, adults started to experience the same thing so we reworked the device a little.

    Now, with a glass of Metamucil, most people pass the device within a few days. Just in time to look at their glowing proofs.

    Thanks for allowing me to get this free advertising in.



    MIchael MCBlane

  2. #12

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    you might look into a luna pro sbc. it is able to tell you pretty much everything you need to know, including very low asa film / paper and exposures that last for minutes ( not a digital meter & not a flash meter.) the good thing is the battery is a regular olde 9 volt. i have seen them used for not too much money ... maybe $150 tops.

    good luck!

    -john

  3. #13

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    I'd like to also suggest the GOSSEN LUNA PRO SBC. I came kicking and screaming into modern times two years ago, when I bought the LUNA PRO. Before that I was quite proud to say that my camera bag did not have one thing in it that required batteries, and that included my Weston Master II meter.

    The Luna Pro has become a trusted friend. It is a fantastic reflective/incedint meter by itself. It does have other options to expand it's value to the photographer. I use several attachments for it: the 1/5/10 degree spot meter, the microscope attachment,and the copy attachment.

    You can find them on used eBay, and at most camera shops around the web.
    "Hey, I don't tell you how to tell me what to do, so don't tell me how to do what you tell me to do!"-Bender Bending Rodriguez

  4. #14

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    How come michael get's to advertise his product so blatantly.

    I vote for the Luna Pro as well as the Sekonic L718, just wish it had a one degree spot attachment instead of a 5 degree.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  5. #15
    clogz's Avatar
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    I dunno what this metering fuss is all about.I just walk to the pond and ask the Koi for advice on camera settings.
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

  6. #16

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    I am sure that I am at a similar stage to you - new to MF and learning my way around a Rolleiflex. I bought a Gossen Lunasix on ebay for a reasonable price and it has been very accurate. It can do reflected and incident readings, not flash, and can take attachments if required. It is particularly good at low light readings and goes way beyond what a 35mm can offer. (Don't forget to increase exposure when using filters though).

    From personal experience, I would go for something like this and not get too bogged in zone systems, etc, until you are more comfortable with the basics of exposure. My exposures went a bit haywire as I dived head first into complicated manuals and advice. I have since gone back to basics, with occasional bracketing, and my exposures are more stable now.

    As a side note, my Rolleiflex has an exposure table on the back, a more advanced version of what used to come on the inside of film boxes. In most general outdoor scenarios it matches the reading given by the light meter exactly.

  7. #17

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    Karl

    I disagree that he should not worry about getting bogged down by zone system stuff until he gets the idea of exposure down. I went that route and then had to relearn everything when I realized I wanted more from my negatives. If I had actively pursued a method of exposing such as the Zone System or BTZS from the outset I would not have spent a number of years unhappy with my prints.

    Those prints lacked something that did not show up until I began to actively make my negatives meet my vision. In BW this is done by intentionally making certain objects match specific grey tones. If a person is cobnscious of this from the beginning I think they would have much more successes early on. I know I would have.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  8. #18
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    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  9. #19
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    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  10. #20
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    fwiw, if you choose to buy a meter you need to look into (a spot meter usually requires this) the one distinct advantage of a digital model is that the ev will be easy to read in low light whereas the analog needle may be very difficult to see in that circumstance.

    though the 'zone system' can seem enormously intimidating in its worst and most densitometric moments, it's really just a way of understanding how the film will record the various tonalities of the scene. you can get a great deal out of this method of visualizing without ever having to run a test or calibrate a thing...though such efforts will obviously be worth it in obtaining the utmost precision....by thinking this way about exposure.

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