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  1. #21

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    I use a Polaris Flash meter with a pseudo spot attachment. It is a good meter, and easy to work with. Also, for zone work a put together a zone dial from an old issue of View Camera - not perfect, but it works.
    Mike C

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  2. #22

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    I use a Polaris Flash meter with a pseudo spot attachment. It is a good meter, and easy to work with. Also, for zone work a put together a zone dial from an old issue of View Camera - not perfect, but it works.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  3. #23
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    It is fairly easy to go overboard in the choice of a Light Meter. I use a Gossen "Ultra-Pro". I do *LOT* of studio work, and most of my metering involves incident metering with the Gossen Studio (swivelling) Incident Attachment, in *Flash* mode.

    I am giving *serious* thought towards purchasing the ARAX - modified Prism with intergal spot and averaging meter to expand "out-of-studio" mtering capabilities.

    I would think your choice should be influenced by your modes of work ... If Studio Flash units are involved, the major concern would be flash metering capabilites... Flash combined with Spot metering might be interesting ... but I've never thought that it would be useful in the "heat-of-battle" atmosphere of studio work --- there is just not enough spare time to be *really* precise.

    I would imagine that a Large Format photographer - involved in landscape - and "psuedo-landscape" work, where a lot of time for each exposure - and in applying the Zone System to single sheet exposures - would find spot metereing to be supremely useful.

    Other than those considerations - the choices, Gossen, Sekonic, Minolta, Pentax -- and probably lots more -- all appear to be reliable and cost effective.

    One thing I might suggest - as would be a good idea with any high-priced gear ... If you can, borrow or rent a prospective meter and "see how it feels" in real life.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  4. #24
    glbeas's Avatar
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    I have a Minolta III incident and a Minolta Spotmeter F and one thing I learned between them is I love the fact that the Spotmeter F takes a AA cell. The incident takes a 6 volt something or other thats a PITA to find though it lasts a good while. It would be interesting to know what the other brands use, it's one good factor in the user friendly aspect of the meters.
    Gary Beasley

  5. #25
    David Ruby's Avatar
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    I too have the Luna Pro. I found one used, in great condition on Ebay a year or so ago for $30. Same thing for sale at the mall, albeit new, for $250. I'm an amateur for sure, but it is very easy for me and seems pretty accurate.

    I have the manual in digital format if you end up needing one.

  6. #26
    mobtown_4x5's Avatar
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    I'm a relative beginner as well, but I have been exposing 4X5 film like mad for about a year now...
    I messed around with Gossen meters and an incredibly complex digital thing made by Sekonik, I ending up taking them all back after I got a used, very old analog Pentax/Honeywell 1° meter that is built well, works great, and is extremely accurate (as compared to the newer meters). Judging from the way it's built, at the time of it's manufacture it must have been a top of the line "pro" item. I highly recommend it. They come up used on ebay from time to time. The only problem with the very old ones like mine is they take a funky battery that is no longer made ( I have a few spares) but I understand that the slightly newer models do not have this problem.
    I deal in measuring/calibration instrumentation for a living, and (having taken this unit apart to examine the circuitry) I can say that this instrument was designed and built with care. (Nothing against the newer products, but they have that lightweight "plastickey" feel of modern consumer electronics).
    And it's about 30 years old, like me :whistle: !

    Matt

  7. #27
    frank's Avatar
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    Earlier in this thread Michael wrote:

    "However now I have developed a special disposable meter that I have clients swallow, so that I can get a better reading of their " inner glow" or their "essence" if you will. This has always been a challenge for us portrait types that feel the need to capture their subjects "essence". A portrait with an underexposed essence has always been a pet peeve of mine. With this new meter, I'm now better able to balance the strobes with this essence and make a far more revealing portrait. I'm planning to put this invention on the market soon and will market it under the name "the Glow Worm". "

    My hat's off to you Michael. I think your disposable type of internal exposure meter has definite advantages over my reusable design!
    (I'd be interested in an exclusive Canadian market distribution deal.)
    My blog / photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

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